Six on Saturday – Platinum

This might take some time.  I’m writing this week’s Six on Saturday on my Mum’s gas powered laptop.  It has languished forgotten in the cupboard since 1836 when she upgraded to a solar paneled tablet.  Once we had located the cranking handle (filed under archaic miscellany) and turned it over a few times it started up surprisingly easily.  And it is working very well.  As long as you are of the opinion that speed is an over-rated phenomenum.  The point, that I will hopefully reach before you all nod off,  is that I think this devotion to duty deserves a gold star on Mister Prop’s progress chart.  The reason being as follows:  a) location, b) content c) inclination.  At the moment I am in a different country to the one that my garden is located.  I have once again left OH home alone to the horror that ensues when I leave, that is peace and quiet and no backchat.  b)  Necessity has led me to utilize Clause 567, Subsection 34a in the Six on Saturday Constitution.  All the following plants were in my garden at some point but are are now in Max’s.  All were grown from seed.  c)  Driving on the M4 westward on a Friday afternoon to spend the weekend doing Peggy’s garden has left me a gibbering wreck.   However I have summoned all my inner strength and, aided by some thinly veiled threats by my mother, I have managed to complete my task.  On reflection this might warrant the platinum award.  What do you think?  After all that gibbering I best be brief.

First we have Lobelia bridgesii and heavily laden friend.  Gorgeous and gorgeous.

Now onto Campanula persicifolia, the peach leaved bellflower.  A great, and I mean that most sincerely folks, self-seeder.  I have an inkling that at least one of his siblings will be white.

Next Cephalaria gigantea,  the giant scabious,  this is a couple of years old now but still not up to its full fighting height.  It has made a rather serendipitous stand with some linaria interlopers.

It is no secret that I am an avid salvia fan and this one is no exception.  Salvia forsskaolii, indigo woodland sage, is a boisterous beauty.

There are two of my Iochroma australe seedlings in Max’s garden and they have both flowered for the first time this year.  As luck would have it, one is white with a hint of pink, and one is dusky blue.  The blue has my vote, but they are both lovely.

When we were kids we jokingly nominated each other football teams, I had Gillingham, my brothers Peterborough and Crystal Palace.  In the same vein I always think of Gillenia trifoliata as my signature plant.  It is thriving in a spot the text books called unsuitable after the removal of a nearby large tree.  Very adaptable us Gill’s.

Right, better get on, got gardening to do!

 

 

 

 

19 thoughts on “Six on Saturday – Platinum

  1. You poor thing. You should have taken the alternative route, though it’s a bit muddy as they haven’t built it. But at least the good Welsh air will get you back to normal* quickly. Say “Hi” to Peggy for me. That you left E behind explains why every supermarket within a 30 mile radius of Chez Gill is out of beer.

    * Normal, in this case, is relative. xx

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  2. Love the lobelia and the salvia. Your campanula looks more like Campanula trachelium to me, a very enthusiastic self seeder. Campanula persicifolia flowers are more cup shaped and they are not hairy. Sorry, I’m being pedantic again. Well done on getting your six together despite all the difficulties. I’ve been too busy finding room for and planting 86 dahlias that I grew from seed. There were 100 but I thought that was too many so I gave a few away.

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    • I think you are right, please don’t apologise I would rather be corrected. I thought it looked a little meagre. Just trying to remember where I got the seed from – perhaps HPS. Can I just say 86 dahlia !!!!!! You are excused all duties. 🙂

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  3. I’ve not heard of Gillenia trifoliata before. Going to look it up later. It’s rather lovely.

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  4. I have a Gillenia trifoliata but she is rather puny compared to yours. Hopefully next year she will perform better. And I am becoming very fond of salvias. Even bought a new one ‘Love and Wishes’ this week with the most gorgeous dark magenta flowers, each held by a dark burgundy calyx.

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  5. The Scabious is very interesting in closeup. What an unattractive name it has, poor thing. I’m a fan of salvias too, but mine are looking miserable and frost burnt just now, so it’s nice to see a sunny picture of yours looking so chipper.

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  6. As with the iochroma, I sort of believe that the blue campanula might actually be prettier than the white. Does that type reliably put out a few white? There is some here that is always blue, but it may not be seeding. It creeps so well that it might be doing only that. It all depends on the situation of course. We can get away with more white in the deep green and brown of the redwood forests.

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  7. After a bit of fiddling I fixed your link. We’ll blame your mother. I have that campanula, I will now look forward to several more of them next year. I also have that funny salvia. I am sure i didn’t deliberately grow that one, i think it was mislabeled seed in the 2017 HPS scheme. I’m not convinced I like it, the leaves are a bit ugly and large with it. Might get rid. Well done on your creditable, if slightly bumbling, perseverance! 😁

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    • Thank you, not being an officinado of a tablet I couldn’t work out how to cut and paste the link. I was getting very close to the end of my tether by the end of the day! Next time I will take my laptop with me. 🙂

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