Six on Saturday – Murk

I feel a little bit confused. Not unusual, it’s true, but the severity of the confusion seems all the more at the moment. I mean to say, what day is it?! Saturday of course, it is Six on Saturday time. I am barely into my January sabbatical (big word for a month off) and I’m drifting about like a anchorless dingy. I am chomping at the bit to get out and do stuff in the garden, but it has been so wet that even in the tempting rain-free interludes the ground is sodden and I know better than to stomp (rather than chomp) about on easily compacted soil. Frustrating. I suppose that is the name of the January game. However, all is not lost. There are plenty of people out there enjoying sun and warmth and all things floriferous, and there are others, like me, who are dreaming of sunshine, and some that might well be under a blanket of snow. If you check out The Prop you will be able to catch up on what is what and what is not in the world of SoS. Come on now, let us shake a New Year leg.

First, we have a snail. Not a real snail, but a monster to scare the others off snail. It hasn’t worked in the past, I live in hope.

Next, a hitchhiker. A plant that I have previously dug up at great physical cost, cursed on its defiant return and later its prolific self-seeding. Now I am activity tending this thug in its host pot of watsonia. It is bronze fennel, Foeniculum vulgare ‘Purpureum’, and I don’t know what I am thinking. If I moan at a later date please feel free to say “told you so”,”when will you ever learn?” and the like.

This Christmas our household was the proud recipient of two bird feeders. The bog standard one from me to him, the fancy pants acorn from my astute nephew and his partner. As our garden is not on the birdie super highway, I was jumpy uppy downy thrilled this week to see a sparrow on BS and a robin taking full advantage of FP. Very happy me. They will come.

Onto the anaemic leaves of emerging ranunculus. Early, I know, but at least it has turned up to the party.

Someone who has never left the party is Osteospermum ‘Purple Sun’, pictured next to our rainwater reservoir, AKA a plastic box. Ever ready to pop the odd flower out, so far any attempt at cold hasn’t thwarted its enthusiasm. Long may this last.

Finally, I bought some seed. Yes, I know, I have a biscuit tin full of seed. OK, fair cop, I have two biscuit tins full of seed. But I do need, yes need is the correct word, some reliable fresh seed for a talk/practical presentation I will be doing in March. I have a certain responsibility. And I love Rudbeckia ‘Irish Eyes’ and I just had to have Ipomoea ‘Heavenly Blue’ and ………

That is your lot. Have fun, stay safe, ’til next time, my friends.

19 thoughts on “Six on Saturday – Murk

  1. Well….. You need to insert a “yet” in the appropriate place in the bit about your bird feeders. Don’t worry about that fennel seeding, just don’t create a flower bed under the feeders; the mower will take care of the results far more easily. And the fennel will become insignificant in comparison!

    Nice to see that Ben has already infiltrated your new abode. We can compete πŸ€“. You could start a cut flower business. Do tell us more about your March plans. Will there be a heckling opportunity? I love a good heckle.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Wow to the acorn feeder – very impressive, as is the ranunculus. I had one successful year growing them 3 or 4 years ago and nothing but failure with them ever since. I wonder if the snails actually travel far and wide to see the giant snail ornament, have a bit of a Stonehengesque solstice party and enjoy the nearby culinary delights? Do snails have a TripAdvisor equivalent?!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I’m not sure I have much hope for the ranunculus for a second year. Never worked for me before. I have checked snail TripAdvisor and it has very poor reviews so I should be safe enough. Watch this space! 🐌🐌🐌🐌

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Ooh, ranunculus, yet another year I have neglected to plant any. My anemones are in a similar state though. One hopes they haven’t peaked too soon. So far I am managing to delete every email urging me to buy spring blooms. Luckily no actual brochures have arrived.

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  4. I’m very impressed by the acorn bird feeder! I recently acquired bird feeder made from an old chimney (the sort with a domed cover over the top) – it weighs a tonne but it looks suitable interesting!

    A client of mine had some bronze fennel growing in their patio. I really wanted to get rid as it clung on to the morning dew and gave me a good soaking every time I squeezed past it. I wasn’t allowed to. In their defence it did look rather splendid!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Okay, . . . no comment on the fennel. Well, ‘that’ fennel at least. I do happen to like the common naturalized sort, with bright grassy green foliage. I do not think of it as invasive though, perhaps because it is controlled by the climate here. It used to be naturalized, to a minor degree, in the drainage ditches of the Santa Clara Valley. It is as gone as the ditches now. I miss it, and have only neglected to grow it because others have mentioned that it can get invasive. I do not see how it could be invasive if it is harvested prior to bloom.

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  6. Very impressive bird feeders, lucky birds. If your snail works maybe I could borrow it. Every morning I come down to slimy trails on the rug in my dining room. I never catch the culprits at it, they wait until I’m asleep. It’s revolting and hoovering every day is not usually part of my routine, I resent it deeply. Lots of exciting seeds, wonderful. Of course we all have tinfuls of seeds, but we want new and different ones.

    Like

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