Six on Saturday – Wise Words

Buddleja 'Black Knight'

Another day, another Six on Saturday.  As I am on a jolly holiday trip today I have risen very, very, very early* to contribute to this popular meme, for fear of the wrath of The Emperor Prop if I should miss another week**.  Due to my extreme rushdom these photos could have done with a retake/delete, but as these pictures where snapped at the crack of dawn*** this was not possible.  In an attempt to justify excuse disguise my bad craftmanship explain, I decided to use the noble medium of metaphor to get me out of a sticky situation enlighten you.

Lesson One.  Do not judge a flower by its lazy photographer.
Let us begin with the moody tones of Buddleja ‘Black Knight’.  From this, carefully selected, angle the blooms are mostly in the shade.  We have been robbed of an accurate representation of its beauty.  This requires the viewer to exercise their imagination to complete the picture.  It is important to keep the brain muscle active.  Basically I am doing you a favour.

Roscoea purpurea

Lesson Two.  Out of sight is out of a scatty mind.
Earlier in the year I dug up this Roscoea purpurea and potted it up for safe keeping.  This spring, although I was patient, nothing came up in the pot.  This poked up its cheeky head last week.  In the ground.  At the exact spot that I had dug it up.  The question is what did I cosset through the harsh spell?  A figment of my imagination perhaps.

Meconopsis napaulensis

Lesson Three:  All that glistens is not gold platform boots.
Even when it is out of focus.  The flower heads of Miscanthus nepalensis are sprinkled with pure sunlight.  These gilded strands carry the seeds which will make more of these stunning plants. Once into their stride, this is but a baby, they produce spectacular, polished metallic, rasta dreads.  A very special sight.

sidalcea

Lesson Four:  Ignorance is sometimes bliss
Or, don’t believe anything you are told.  Except of course that you are lovely.  This white sidalcea was sold to me as an unknown geranium.  Unknown, yes, geranium, no.  The result is quite blissful.  To represent the hazy nature of my knowledge off this plant, I have employed this vaseline smeared effect.

Fuchsia hatchbachii

Lesson Five:  Behind every great fuchsia is an great one.
Could be construed as, “don’t always look at the ones that push themselves to the front, the ones just behind are sometimes much clearer”.  Fuchsia hatchbachii, a favourite of mine, is proving this point.

Hedychium 'Tara' seedling

Lesson Six:  Honesty is the best policy.
Usually anyway.  Sometimes, in order to avoid misunderstanding or misrepresentation, words are not necessary.  Here Hedychium ‘Tara’ is speaking for herself using her beauty alone.

That is your lot.  Now you can nip on over to The Propagator’s site and find a cornucopia of SoSers, that should keep you out of mischief for a little while.  As for myself, I must bid you adieu, off to RHS Rosemoor Flower Show ……

*If you believe this, you would believe anything
** I’m just kidding myself, he doesn’t even notice, he has so many loyal subjects, I am just another acolyte.
*** See * above

26 thoughts on “Six on Saturday – Wise Words

  1. All lovely, especially Fuchsia hatchbachii, mine also thriving. Might bump in to you later, I am also going off to Rosemoor!

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  2. My brain worked and I concluded that this budhleia flower is probably faded 😁 … that could be the solution of this backlit image (joke)
    I particularly liked the fuchsia that gives a “wax texture and a wine lees tone” . Great Six Gill

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  3. Cracking job of celebrating your successes by picking on my failures: I’ve got a bud on my ‘Tara’ for the first time in years, poor thing, in totally the wrong place, and my poor Miscanthus nepaulensis was denied water in the drought and is looking pathetic. Fuchsia hatschbachii is still flowerless too. Sadly, you’re going to get back from Rosemoor and find that your Meconopsis has turned into a Miscanthus. Miaow!

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    • Thanks Jim, it has been corrected now, a brain blip! I have pampered my Tara, extra water and feed after neglecting it last year. I think it has rewarded me. Hope your others catch up, especially the miscanthus. 🙂

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  4. Gill Gill Gill. What can have befallen you as a teenage gardener that you believe that i am sitting in righteous judgment of a) your participation and b) the quality of your photos?

    *licks stub of pencil and makes entry into the Big SoS Ledger of Reckoning. “Heavens. Present, just, but clearly a rush job. Monitor.”

    Remember, just cos you’re paranoid, doesn’t mean they’re not out to get you!!

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  5. hehe I couldn’t help laughing at what you wrote about your Roscoea purpurea – I’d dug up a chive plant and moved it earlier in the year, only to come back a few months later to discover a bigger chive plant than I’d moved, growing exactly where I’d dug it up from. Maybe scattiness is just natures way of making sure a plant is where it would thrive rather than where we want it?

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  6. Haha… love this post and your sense of humour. Hope you enjoyed Rosemoor. I thought about it but four hours driving at this time of year put me off. And anyway I have just spent a fortune on new plants…
    PS Your photos are fabulous!

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  7. Lesson Four: I had to get my mother a Yoshino flowering cherry because she loves those in Washington D. C. so much. I tried to explain their history in regard to why they came from Japan to Washington D. C. as well as Seattle and San Jose, but my mother thinks that they are from Washington D. C. only. My Pa informed me that they ‘are’ from Washington D. C.. I will not argue with that.

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  8. Well someone’s certainly Mr P’s pet. Only a ‘monitoring’? Last week, I was tossed into SoS gaol for lying about my dogo’s name – & he’s in witness protection, so I was right to do so. Ok, now that’s off my chest, back to you – a coupla plants here I didn’t know – 3 & 6 – but think I could come to love. And I really never saw the attraction of ornamental grasses until joining SoS. Love that golden platform shoe of a number in your garden.

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