Six on Saturday – Ruthless

Bidens 'Firelight'

Beware, I am in a ruthless mood today.  Inhabitants of the garden that have not been performing to my exacting standards have been extradited to the green bin.  Oleander that has never flowered, promised once but was only joking – Out!  Dead stick thing that has been in extensive care for so long the label has rubbed clean – Out!  Scrubby grass with no aesthetic merit whatsoever but for some perverse reason I have always felt sorry for – Out!  OH has been hiding.

I feel cleansed and ready to write my Six on Saturday.  We are semi-anarchic group led by Prop Guevara, take a look at his manifesto and all will become clear.  You will also meet others in this band of merry folk.

My first offering is Bidens ‘Firelight’.  I am fond of bidens.  They seem to like me too.

Next we have Impatiens puberula,  which earlier this year I transferred from its pot in the back garden into a large barrel in the front garden.  After an initial period of homesickness, it has settled in very well, spreading dramatically and beginning to flower well.  It is not surprising that it is a little ragged around the edges.  The very un-British weather we are enjoying hasn’t really suited this native of cool moist forests in Nepal.

You can have too much of a good thing.  This Verbascum chaixii, the nettle leaved mullein, has done too well.  After it has flowered, in the autumn I suppose, it will be lifted and divided and shared to all and sundry.  In the meantime it is providing a feeding station for bees, no caterpillars spotted yet.

Catanache caerula 'Alba'

Catanache caerulea ‘Alba’, or the white cupid’s dart, is next.   I grew this from seed last year.   The joy of seeing a flower bloom that you have propagated never diminishes.

watsonia

Now a watsonia seedling, a bit of a tender Terry, it was one of the many I was worried about earlier in the year.  It is not flowering as prolifically as it did last year, but I can forgive it for the harsh treatment it withstood.  The colour is wonderful.

grasshopper

Sat on the steps earlier, worn out by my tyranny, I felt that I was being watched.  Glancing sideways at the pot of begonias to my right, I saw this little chap, who kindly stayed in position whilst I dashed inside to get my camera.  As for the rest of the plants, you can all relax now.  For the moment anyway.

That is that.  All done.  Thanks for your leadership Propman.  Next week perhaps …..

 

Six on Saturday – Rush 2

The chilli is made, the guest room is ready, the shopping done, the fridge well stocked and the washing is on the line.  That leaves me a small window of opportunity to contribute to this week’s Six on Saturday before my nephew and his girlfriend arrive to stay for a couple of days.  Take a look at The Propagator’s blog and all will be revealed although it really is quite simple.  The concept, wait for it, is Six …… on ……. Saturday.  So here are mine.

The white lobelia in the front planters have eventually begun to flower.  As an added bonus this particular shade of white appears to be white and blue, which I am not complaining about, in fact I am really quite pleased.

Next we have a dark leaved geranium that I grew from seed.  It is in its second year and this is the first time it has flowered.  Again I am not disappointed by the ethereal blue, especially set against the moody foliage.  Looks like the molluscs have enjoyed it as well.

Eschscholtzia californica 'Red Chief'Another seed grown lovely is this california poppy,  Eschscholzia californica ‘Red Chief’, won in the same seed war as the nasturtium in last week’s Six on Saturday – Raindrops keep falling on my flowers.

Potentilla 'Volcan'

Now we have the deep dark Potentilla ‘Volcan’, with Festuca glauca ‘Intense Blue’ in the background.  The grass is looking surprising healthy, considering it is frequently used as a cushion by Fat Ol, the ginger not-tom-anymore, from next door.

Primula capitata 'Noverna Deep Blue'

A new purchase this week is this Primula capitata ‘Noverna Deep Blue’.  An impulse purchase.  But then they generally are.

Leucocoryne 'Andes'

Lastly a fluke photo.  Leucocoryne ‘Andes’ and friend.   Sometimes luck is on your side.

Bit of a rush through, but needs must.   Thanks again to Mr Propenstein, has he invented a monster?  It certainly is growing and growing and growing and growing …..

Six on Saturday – Raindrops keep falling on my flowers

gazania

Someone must have speeded the film up.  It can’t possibly be Saturday again.  There is so much to cram into every week, it doesn’t seem fair that the time seems to pass more quickly at this time of year.   As we are pondering this anomaly, puzzled looks on our faces, gaining yet more wrinkles, there is a more than likely a crack team of scientists studying this very phenomena.  Let us hope so.  I could do with a few more hours at the very least.  The hard fact is that we are back in our happy place again.  Six on Saturdayland.  Take a look at the website of The Grand Vizier of the Independent State of SoS where you will find other Islanders and a guide to help you on your way if you wish to join in with the conga.  Let us proceed.  Due to circumstance all of my flowers this week are a little wet.  It has mizzle/drizzle/rained all day and although this scuppered my plans I am pleased for the garden.

First of all we have a gazania, the first flower to open from a couple of trays of locally grown mixed plants.  I’m sure they have been enjoying the hot sunny spell we have had up until today.  Quite what this sun-loving, South African daisy will think of the dreary North Devon weather I can’t be sure.  Might make a nice change, although this is unlikely.

Salvia argentea

Next we the Salvia argentea, silver sage, a fabulously furry creature that I have mentioned before in Six on Saturday – Monochrome.   I am pleased to report that it over-wintered and is as adorable as ever.  A pet without the vet fees.

Hosta

Now we have a hosta, which has so far escaped the inevitable ravages of molluscs.  In order to keep a keen eye on it, it lives in pot outside the front door.  It was a gift, along with a couple of others, from Chambercombe Bob and is just about to flower.  I am very fond of it.  Bob’s nice too.

Nasturtium 'Black Velvet'

On to Nasturtium ‘Black Velvet’, which although is quite velvety isn’t terribly black.   A bit out of focus, but it was raining and I was balancing and who cares.   This seed was purchased at an end of season cut price jamboree/full-on-combat event.  Everything was fifty pence, I am hyperventilating just thinking about it.  Myself and Nancy Nightingale wrestled a rather persistent lone male shopper for the spoils.  No prizes for guessing who won the bout.  We make a fine tag team.

pelargonium

A rather pretty pink pelargonium is next, unnamed, bog standard, generic and quite beautiful.

primula

Finally, a little late on parade, we have a buttercup yellow primula.  Bought on a stall somewhere on my travels, perhaps car boot sale or open garden.  It is a welcome splash of colour before my tardy dahlias begin their display.  If I can keep them safe.  Which is not a given.

That is your lot my lovelies.  Until the next time!

Six on Saturday – Angels and Demons

rose

Hip hip hooray, it’s another Saturday!  I’ve had a haircut and a bowl of chips with mayonnaise and now I am ready for anything.  Even a Six on Saturday.  No idea what I am talking about?  Where have you been?  Lost in the Bornean jungle, or Ikea’s soft furnishing department? Don’t worry, Sir Propalot will update you on proceedings.

First we have a splendid rose.  It was in the garden when we moved here, so I have a valid reason for not knowing which one it is.  I suppose I could do a little research, but to be honest I’m not that bothered.  All I know is that it is beautiful and fragrant.  Which is adequate.

Parahebe 'Snow Clouds'

Next we have Parahebe ‘Snow Cloud’ which has weathered the hard winter admirably. The other parahebe in the garden, although alive, has not fared so well.  It is looking decidedly ropey and is on the “pull yourself together or you are out” list.  Swotty Snow Cloud is definitely not on that list.  Straight to the top of the class you go!

pyracantha

Spikey plants are not encouraged in the gardens that I work in, let alone in my own.  OH bought this pyracantha, even though when he suggested it I said through gritted teeth “if you want it, feel free”.   I concede that it is great for the wildlife and the flowers are rather lovely.  This does not detract from the fact it is a vicious monster to the gardener.

primula

A little late to the spring party, but none the less very welcome, this primula is strutting its stuff this weekend.

Geranium nodosum

Earlier this week I said to Ms Button, whilst attacking the forest of mint that someone decided was a good idea to plant directly into the ground, “Do you ever wish you had a time machine and you could go back to the moment the offending plant was being planted and say “stop, in the name of humanity, do not put that thug in what is to become my garden!””  I would say just that to whoever planted this pink geranium in my garden.  It is a thug and pops up in, under and over everything.  I believe it to be Geranium nodosum.  Ruthless.

Rosa 'Rhapsody in Blue'

Last, but definitely not least, we have Rosa ‘Rhapsody in Blue’.   Not blue, but a rhapsody indeed.  Fragrant and floriferous.  Wonderful.

That is your lot, another week passes, another six to savour.  Some demons, some angels, some demonic angels, some …. you know where I’m going.  Thanks to The Prop, onwards and upwards!

 

Six on Saturday – Another One

rhodohypoxis

Another Six on Saturday.  Another introduction to main man, The Prop.  Another invitation to join us.  Another attempt to take photographs that conceal the slug ravaged, garden mayhem that is my reality.  Here we go ….

Firstly we have Rhodohypoxis baurii.  With minimum (read no) effort, these little charmers come up every spring and flower their little flower socks off.  Even the ones that mysteriously “fell” out of the greenhouse when OH walked by and were stuffed back in the pot, have done their very best.  Lovely.

Geum 'Blazing Sunset'

Next we have Geum ‘Blazing Sunset’, enjoying this morning’s early sunshine.  Enormous, great gallumping flowers, but definitely not as vigorous as it was last year.  Perhaps it is dwindling.  I will try to remember to collect some seed.

Sisyrinchium 'E K Balls'

Sisyrinchium ‘E K Balls’ has decided that he is quite happy in his new planter and will therefore show his pleasure the only way he can.  By blooming.  And being blooming lovely.

allium

This lone allium, planted in the garden before we were dropped off by the mother ship, is just beginning to reveal its violet stars.

Brachyscome 'Magenta Delight'

A few days ago I succumbed to temptation of the worse kind.  Yes, I am talking about The Half Price Offer.  I was putty in their hands.  When I returned from work yesterday, a large box was waiting for me.  Balm indeed.  Along with this gorgeous little Brachyscome ‘Magenta Delight’ came pentemon, gaura and bidens.  All I can say is “welcome”, and don’t expect any special attention after the honeymoon period is over.  Which most probably will be tomorrow.

Osteospermum

Lastly we have an osteospermum.  Not just any pretty pink daisy.  This is the sole survivor of cuttings donated by the Notorious Mr K.  Not dead, just accustoming herself to a new life across the channel.

Thanks to the The Duke of Prop – shimmy over to his blog to find out what has been going on this week across the universe and beyond.   Adieu!

 

 

 

 

 

Six on Saturday – Newbies and Surprises

Bidens

Our Six on Saturday this week comprises of newbies and surprises.  Hopefully all will become clear, although this is not a certainty.  Of course I must first of all introduce our Meme Master, The Propagator, who guides his ever-expanding troupe of SoSer towards oblivion.  Or something like that, you had better take a look at his blog to find out the truth of the matter.

Let us begin with a newbie, one of two little bargain bidens I bought last week.  They are both Beedance hybrids, but as that is as far as the pot description goes, it is therefore the limit of my knowledge.  Except that they are gorgeous, but I think you could work that one out for yourself.  Now planted up in terracotta pots they are brightening up the back door step until the osteos recover from their harsh cut back. It might even inspire them to get a move on.

I grew the above plant from seed, believing it to be a moraea of some persuasion.  Last year it eventually sent up a flower spike and consequently I became very excited.  When I saw the bloom I was less so.  Say hello to my first surprise, Libertia grandiflora.   Although a lovely plant in its own right, I cannot help but feel a tinge of disappointment whenever I see it.  For this reason it might be relocated to a client’s garden.  Sorry Old Chap.  Not a good surprise.

Last weekend I went to the Post Office and came home with three new alpines for my diddy little clay planter.  On Ilfracombe High Street there is an antique/collectables shop that from time to time has a small table of plants at the front.  As I walked on the other side of the street I could hear them calling my name “Gill, Gill” they whispered, “cross the road, come and see how beautiful we are”.  So I did, and four came home with me.  The three planted here are Phlox sublata ‘McDaniel’s Cushion’, Iris setosa (Dwarf Form) and Veronica prostrata ‘Carrapit White’.  The fourth was planted elsewhere and will have to wait for another day.

This dark veined geranium was a sport on a plain pink plant in a client’s garden.  With permission I brought it home to nurture.  It seems to be healthy and upright and has lots of flower buds.   A nice surprise.

Nemesia

For a change this year I have bought some nemesia to join the “out the front in Windy City, Shady Land” gang.  Not their recommended planting position, I would agree.  However, they are strong plants, grown locally, and I liked them.  And I wanted them so I got them.  So far so good.

Salvia 'Joy'

Lastly another newbie I couldn’t resist.  In fact it would have been wrong to even attempt to.  This little darling is Salvia ‘Joy’.

Right, a quick tot up and it seems I have the requisite amount of contenders.  Haven’t heard anything from Mr K yet, hope he has a note.  Thanks again for your omnipresence Mr P, happy Six on Saturday to you all!

Six on Saturday – Celebration

Welcome to another Six on Saturday, the meme of choice for the horticultural in-crowd.  Too cool for school, on-trend, leaders not followers.  You get my gist.  Contributors are herded by none other than the great cultural icon himself, The Propagator.

Before I go any further I have an apology to make, last week, in my haste, I forgot to mention the indomitable Mr K.  As today is his birthday, I will do my best to redress this error. Oh, and I will say, sorry, it won’t happen again.  Let us get a move on, or it will be Sunday before we know it!

Firstly we have a tulip and hosta combo.  After a slow start to the season things are beginning to catch up with themselves, meaning there are some interesting combinations to be seen.  The spring flowers are overlapping with early summer ones.  Strangers are making new friends.  These tulips have been in prime condition for a couple of weeks now.  They are in a rather shady and exposed spot.  Perhaps that is the trick!

aquilegiaLast year the aquilegias took over the garden and I vowed to ensure that this did not happen again.  It has.  When they have finished flowering and before they seed I will be ruthless.  I promise.

Next is Cerastium tomentosum, also known as dusty miller and snow in summer.  It lives on the wall between our house and our neighbours’.  On a regular basis it is squashed beneath sleeping cats, slices of apple pie, bowls of soup, cupcakes, magazines, plants and elbows.  Doesn’t turn a hair.

They have arrived, in fact they have been here for a couple of weeks, so much for a hard winter killing of pests!  In fact both the aphid and mollusc populations seem to be doing rather nicely, thank you very much.  Not sure what the white one is all about, perhaps it is the ghost of previously squished greenfly and it has come back to teach me a lesson. Gulp!

Another late on parade is Pulmonaria ‘Opal’, a plant that I rescued from a bargain bin somewhere earlier in the year.  I have grown this lungwort before and pounced on the pathetic specimen as soon as I realised what it was.  The colour is enchanting, everything I remembered it to be.

Lastly we have Geranium sylvaticum ‘Mayflower’.  I am big fan of geraniums, they are dependable and long flowering and come in many makes and models.  This wood cranesbill is a great beauty, understated and elegant.  Just like The Birthday Boy!

Thank you Mr Prop, why don’t you pop on over to his blog and find out what the rest of us hipsters have been up to.  Adieu.