Six on Saturday – Time Travel

This week I have had to enlist the assistance of the time machine again, on loan from our very own Six on Saturday Time Lord, Dr Prop.  At this very moment in time I am not only here with you I am also up to high jinx on another planet, possibly indulging in age inappropriate dance moves and eating too many vol au vents.  Something like that anyway.

First we have an argyranthemum.  A new purchase and a lovely one too.   It is very likely that I have said this before, but I will tell you again just in case you have forgotten.  A few years ago, when I asked his esteened opinion, a very knowledgeable, finger on the pulse, RHS type of person said that argyranthemums were the way forward.  I quite agree.

On to the demon hybrid bluebell.  They are here.  They look very pretty.  We cannot blame them for that.

Next we have a hellebore stuck in Groundhog Day.  I don’t mind in the slightest, although I do hope it doesn’t exhaust itself.  I don’t want to be hearing excuses next year.

Next another new purchase, an osteospermum.   It wasn’t in flower when I bought it, but I took a chance.  I am a wild child.  Perhaps more accurately a wild woman a little past the first flush of youth.  No matter.  You know what they say, “faint heart never won fair Whirlygig”  (possibly).

Last weekend we had some visitors from the Big City.   As the planters at the front of the house were very “Winter into Spring shabby and not in the slightest bit chic” I decided to install “Summer into Autumn fresh and unsullied by neither time nor mollusc”.  I think they were fooled into thinking I keep a tidy garden.  One of the newbies is this Bidens ferulifolia.  This lovely is everything a bedding plant should be, bright, floriferous with the possibility of surviving the winter to give us more joy next year.

And bringing up the rear is a mini cheat.  This tulip is not in my garden, nor was it ever.  However over the last few weeks I have greatly enjoyed the glorious rise and fall of the blooms.  Slowly transforming from tender young buds to silken brazen hussies.  Just wonderful.

There we have it, another six.  And don’t forget, if you need to borrow the time machine, just contact Dr Prop and he will put you on the waiting list.  It comes in extremely useful sometimes.

Six on Saturday – Bunnies

Happy Six on Saturday Easter!  Or should that be Happy Easter Six on Saturday?  Whichever, I hope your Easter is a good one, whether or not you partake in this weekly rite.  Not sure what I am on about?  Nothing new there then.  It may all become a little clearer if you visit The Easter Bunny of Propdom’s site.  He will explain, and while you are there you can find out what all the other bunnies have been up to.

Shall we begin with a fat green caterpillar looking splendid in the magnificent blue bowl of Anemone coronaria ‘Bordeaux’, featured previously.   If we don’t allow caterpillars then there will be no butterflies or moths.  As I have discovered this week, the human species inflict more damage on my plants and aren’t half as pretty.   It is good to share sometimes.

Next we have the Cappadocian navelwort, Omphalodes cappadocica.  Such a pretty plant, a blue of the angels.  I half-inched this piece from Lady Mantle’s estate when she otherwise engaged (on her gin break).  As I was already nailed for the theft of one plant I thought I might as well go for broke and take another.  Although the wanted poster is rather fetching likeness, I consider 30 bob and half a corned beef sandwich a rather insulting reward for my apprehension.

On to Dodecatheon meadia, the shooting star.  It is just coming into bloom and each year charms me with its downward pointing dart-like flowers.   At the moment it is growing in a pot, which is not ideal but means I can bring it in and out of the spotlight as warranted.  Now it is in prime place, as it deserves.

Next another emerging Woolies acer.  In the last few weeks I have been systematically ….. hang on a minute who I am trying to kid, that is absolutely nonsense, I have never been systematic in my entire life……. I have been randomly potting up and on, renewing compost and feeding all the permanent pot residents.   They thank me for this spring clean and renourishment.

Bleeding heart, bleeding wonderful.

Finally my cunning tulip plan of the autumn, to pack Tulipa ‘Orange Emperor’ and Tulipa ‘Purple Prince’ into the Belfast sink, has finally come to fruition.  Admittedly there are more earth shattering innovations, but on a cold November weekend it seemed pretty avant garde.   The crowd were on the edge of their seat for a while when the purples flowered and the oranges were a no-show, but eventually everyone caught up and it is now looking splendid.  A happy ending.  Just as it should be.

Happy hopping everyone!

 

Six on Saturday – Celebration

Welcome to another Six on Saturday, the meme of choice for the horticultural in-crowd.  Too cool for school, on-trend, leaders not followers.  You get my gist.  Contributors are herded by none other than the great cultural icon himself, The Propagator.

Before I go any further I have an apology to make, last week, in my haste, I forgot to mention the indomitable Mr K.  As today is his birthday, I will do my best to redress this error. Oh, and I will say, sorry, it won’t happen again.  Let us get a move on, or it will be Sunday before we know it!

Firstly we have a tulip and hosta combo.  After a slow start to the season things are beginning to catch up with themselves, meaning there are some interesting combinations to be seen.  The spring flowers are overlapping with early summer ones.  Strangers are making new friends.  These tulips have been in prime condition for a couple of weeks now.  They are in a rather shady and exposed spot.  Perhaps that is the trick!

aquilegiaLast year the aquilegias took over the garden and I vowed to ensure that this did not happen again.  It has.  When they have finished flowering and before they seed I will be ruthless.  I promise.

Next is Cerastium tomentosum, also known as dusty miller and snow in summer.  It lives on the wall between our house and our neighbours’.  On a regular basis it is squashed beneath sleeping cats, slices of apple pie, bowls of soup, cupcakes, magazines, plants and elbows.  Doesn’t turn a hair.

They have arrived, in fact they have been here for a couple of weeks, so much for a hard winter killing of pests!  In fact both the aphid and mollusc populations seem to be doing rather nicely, thank you very much.  Not sure what the white one is all about, perhaps it is the ghost of previously squished greenfly and it has come back to teach me a lesson. Gulp!

Another late on parade is Pulmonaria ‘Opal’, a plant that I rescued from a bargain bin somewhere earlier in the year.  I have grown this lungwort before and pounced on the pathetic specimen as soon as I realised what it was.  The colour is enchanting, everything I remembered it to be.

Lastly we have Geranium sylvaticum ‘Mayflower’.  I am big fan of geraniums, they are dependable and long flowering and come in many makes and models.  This wood cranesbill is a great beauty, understated and elegant.  Just like The Birthday Boy!

Thank you Mr Prop, why don’t you pop on over to his blog and find out what the rest of us hipsters have been up to.  Adieu.

 

Soggy Six on Saturday

Another wet Saturday.  Another soggy Six on Saturday, SSoS.  If you would like to see how wet or dry my compadres are then pop over to the captain of our ship The Propagator and find out for yourself.

So let us splodge on.  Shall we talk about the rain? In order to accurately convey my feelings on the subject I have composed my own little ditty, based on an ancient English nursery rhyme, here we go: “It’s raining it’s pouring, good Lord it is so boring”.  I know, so many talents, it really isn’t fair on the rest. Across the road the local team are preparing to play a game endemic to these parts, swamp rugby with visibility of approximately 3m.  If it didn’t mean getting soaked myself, I think it would be a very amusing match to watch.  But I digress.  I had considered taking all my photos from indoors, where it isn’t quite as damp.  My first picture is an attempt at inside/out SoSing.  I am not sure it works.  Further fearing the ridicule of my peers I gathered courage and waterproofs and stepped out into the mire.

primulas

Earlier today, whilst shopping for provision for the ark (hay, spare wildebeests, ants and gin mainly) I spotted this tray of jolly primulas.  It would have been rude not to.  They will be ideal for one of my new pots.  As you can see I have already carefully positioned them.  At least they will be getting watered there, unlike in the place from whence they came.

Yesterday I spotted this germinated seed on top of the soil in the front garden.   I am hoping it is a Rhodotypos scandens, as it is not far from the shrub and looks vaguely familiar.  When it stops raining I will pot it up, unless someone eats it in the meantime.  What I should have done is push it gently into the ground and mark its position.  Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

cyclamen

Next this blushing cyclamen. No words needed. Except perhaps “yum”.

Now some good news.  The tulips I planted in the autumn have eventually begun to poke their noses through the compost.  I was beginning to doubt that I had actually planted them.

osteospermum

And lastly, the valiant osteospermum, native of South Africa, lover of hot, dry conditions, continuing to bud and flower in monsoon condition.   A repeat I know.  But I don’t care.  Respect.

There we have it, another Six on Saturday completed.  Thanks Mr P.  Another gold star on the chart for me?

 

 

 

 

 

Nameless

Tulip and bee

For various reasons, many of which may appear to be a product of my fertile imagination but are in fact quite true, I haven’t tended Mr and Mrs Bun’s garden for a month.

The upshot of this was that my visit today was full of discovery.  Some things have bloomed and bolted. Much has grown, as is only right at this time of year, and a few have succumbed and gone to the great compost heap in the sky (well bottom of the garden actually).  The lilac was in full regalia, the forget-me-nots overstretched, the wildflower meadow was showing great promise and the foxglove/camassia/vinca combo an accidental triumph.  The blackbirds chicks have fledged the nest and fearlessly accompanied us around the garden.  When they weren’t rustling in the vegetation they were nagging their parents for food.

But most arresting of all were these tulips, their name lost in the depths of the recycle bin.  I don’t care what the stunners are called, and nor does the ecstatic bumblebee filling his tank at the pollen station.  We both agreed, these peaches and cream peony flowered blooms made our day. Well I’m sure that is what the bee would have told me if he wasn’t so engrossed in his food finding business.  Just lovely.