Six on Saturday – Older and Wiser

Here we go again, the world is another year older, another year wiser.  One out of two aint bad.   And of course, the first Six on Saturday of the year.  Check out what is happening in the rest of the world, SoS-wise, over at The Prop’s.  If you have a New Year’s resolution going spare you could join the slightly-dysfunctional-but-ever-so-charming gang of reprobates.  It’s not that bad.

It was a tricky SoS this week.  Outside was cold and windy, all was uninspiring and there was no chocolate whatsoever, believe me I searched really, really hard until I had to rush inside for an After Eight.  Repeats are inevitable.  I am hoping that you can forgive or have forgotten.

We begin with one of my bedding primulas.  The recent milder weather and kind winds have meant that there is a relatively unblemished flower to show you.  I am rather fond of its pale notched rim and sunny eye.

Next we have Fuchsia “Bornemann’s Beste” which was rocking and rolling in the wind giving me good excuse for a blurry photo.  It was a late starter and has flowered continually since September.  For this I thank it.

Now a pot of deceased New Guinea Impatiens which on closer inspection appear to have been planted on top of tulips.  I think they might be ‘Blue Diamond’.  There are also some mysterious monocot seedlings. As it is located beneath the Libertia grandiflora, it could well be them.  But I have been known to be wrong about such things.

Onto the bulls eye berries of Rhodotypos scandens, stark in the gloom of the front garden.  I’ve never seen a bird dining on this shrub, I wonder if they are less than delicious.  I’m not going to try them out.

And then onto the valiant Osteospermum ‘JK’, spilling over the potted yew.

Finally a nestling fern, wedged between the rocks of our boundary wall.  I think it is a maidenhead spleenwort, a name that starts off Barbara Cartland and ends up Harry Potter.  It is a lovely little green octopus.

That is me done.  Until next time.

 

 

 

Six on Saturday – Eye of the Storm

Salvia 'Blue Angel'

As we have been spared, well I have anyway, Six on Saturday will go ahead as planned.  Please do us all a favour and take a look at the The Prop’s site, he gets in a terrible sulk if you don’t.   And a Propogator sulk is a magnificently terrifying event.

We begin with Salvia patens ‘Blue Angel’.  It is not a secret that I am salvia fiend.  I am also partial to blue flowers.  Cuddly is good too.  Tick, tick, tick and voilà, my idea of heaven.

After yesterday’s crazy squalls and anticipating tomorrow’s predicted storm, today was an eye in the storm of the traditional bank holiday weather.  Unfortunately this window of opportunity did not coincide with a peak in my enthusiasm, rather a surfeit of ennui.  My heels scraped the ground as I dragged outside and did a few bits of potting on and took some late cuttings.  I also planted these, bought last weekend at Rosemoor Garden Show.  They are the corms of Crocus sativus , otherwise known as the saffron crocus.  Apparently it takes between 50,000 and 75,000 plants to produce a pound of this golden spice.  I have thirteen.  Start small, think big.

Nicotiana 'Lime Green'This Nicotiana alata ‘Lime Green’ has proved to be a little belter.  It over wintered (yes, THAT winter) and has gone on to flower through drought and deluge.  Big round of applause please.  It is supposed to be a half-hardy annual.  Someone is confused but I am not complaining.  It would be asking too much to expect it to keep going for another year, so I will try to collect some seed just in case.

Lycianthes rantonnetiiThis was sold to me as Solanum rantonnetii, but apparently it is now known as Lycianthes rantonnetii or the Paraguayan Nightshade.  Top Tip: don’t eat it.  But then I doubt whether you were thinking about it anyway, not with the word “nightshade” in its common name.  A bit of a monster, growing to 2m x 2m, it is at the moment just getting into its stride.

Rhodotypos scandens

Now the fruit of Rhodotypos scandens, common name black jet bead.  It was taking a real battering yesterday, being bent almost double in the thrashing wind and rain.  This morning, it is none the worse for a good shake, rattle and roll.

Glumicalyx nutans

Lastly we have another of my new purchases, the wonderfully monikered South African Glumicalyx nutans.   This plant was bought purely on name and bizarreness value.  You can imagine how thrilled I was to learn that it is commonly known as the nodding chocolate flower.   And yes apparently it does have chocolate scent.  We were meant to be.

All done.  That is your lot.  Thanks Your Royal Propness for hosting another week of SoS.  Na Noo Na Noo.

 

 

 

 

Six on Saturday – Still Hurrying

Crazy times are unabating, so once again I must be brief. Easier said than done. As you may have guessed I tend to go on a bit. Briefish is perhaps more accurate. I don’t want to aim too high. Here we go. Six on Saturday, horrah for the Grand Old Duke of Prop, he knows the business, he is the business. Sashy over and find out all about the Sixers.

It hasn’t made it any easier that I have had to follow that smarty pants brother of mine. Ever the bridesmaid, never the bride. Shall we get started, before I get too self-indulgent?

First of all we have apple blossom. We have two apple trees in our our tiny garden, both planted by the previous owner. I could think of better use for the space, but sentimentality means they stay. For the moment.

Next we have a crop of nasturtiums. A myriad. A self sown plague. Some will be saved, the rest culled. Harsh but fair.

Then a brand new shiny rodgersia. Bronze and beautiful.

Next a candelabra primula, bought from a garden society plant stall, unnamed but no less for it.

Then Rhodotypos scandens, in my front garden. A great favourite of mine and a complete mystery to me why it isn’t grow more widely.

And finally, last week’s hairy bud, now a fully fledged, paid up member of the poppy family.

Thanks Prop me old darling. Next time, all will be calm, time will be plentiful, and I will devote my full attention on the cause. Until then, nanoo nanoo ….

Soggy Six on Saturday

Another wet Saturday.  Another soggy Six on Saturday, SSoS.  If you would like to see how wet or dry my compadres are then pop over to the captain of our ship The Propagator and find out for yourself.

So let us splodge on.  Shall we talk about the rain? In order to accurately convey my feelings on the subject I have composed my own little ditty, based on an ancient English nursery rhyme, here we go: “It’s raining it’s pouring, good Lord it is so boring”.  I know, so many talents, it really isn’t fair on the rest. Across the road the local team are preparing to play a game endemic to these parts, swamp rugby with visibility of approximately 3m.  If it didn’t mean getting soaked myself, I think it would be a very amusing match to watch.  But I digress.  I had considered taking all my photos from indoors, where it isn’t quite as damp.  My first picture is an attempt at inside/out SoSing.  I am not sure it works.  Further fearing the ridicule of my peers I gathered courage and waterproofs and stepped out into the mire.

primulas

Earlier today, whilst shopping for provision for the ark (hay, spare wildebeests, ants and gin mainly) I spotted this tray of jolly primulas.  It would have been rude not to.  They will be ideal for one of my new pots.  As you can see I have already carefully positioned them.  At least they will be getting watered there, unlike in the place from whence they came.

Yesterday I spotted this germinated seed on top of the soil in the front garden.   I am hoping it is a Rhodotypos scandens, as it is not far from the shrub and looks vaguely familiar.  When it stops raining I will pot it up, unless someone eats it in the meantime.  What I should have done is push it gently into the ground and mark its position.  Hindsight is a wonderful thing.

cyclamen

Next this blushing cyclamen. No words needed. Except perhaps “yum”.

Now some good news.  The tulips I planted in the autumn have eventually begun to poke their noses through the compost.  I was beginning to doubt that I had actually planted them.

osteospermum

And lastly, the valiant osteospermum, native of South Africa, lover of hot, dry conditions, continuing to bud and flower in monsoon condition.   A repeat I know.  But I don’t care.  Respect.

There we have it, another Six on Saturday completed.  Thanks Mr P.  Another gold star on the chart for me?