Six on Saturday – No Publicity

It is that time again, the weekly Six on Saturday fix, although I do seem to be a fortnightly kinda gal these days. Exciting/terrifying times and all that. The intention is strong, the ability weak. Someone, also with a lot on his plate but seemingly excuse-free, is our esteemed leader The Propagator. It goes without saying he is incredible/wonderful/magnificent and all that sycophantic blarney which quite frankly gets us no further up the leader board (and I am positive there is one) but does anyone else have a problem spelling his name? Each time I have a battle with o’s and a’s. Perhaps not. Just me. Ever wished you hadn’t mentioned something? Shall we?

First, we have the long awaited (in my house) arrival of the aeonium flowers. They have been mustering-up for many months and eventually they are letting rip. I realise it is the dance of death, but hey ho, easy come, easy go. *sobs*

Next the leaf bud of Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’. Can I depend on you to be discreet, as the subject is yet to be broached? The decision has been made that we will be leaving this beautiful young tree behind when we move. Too large, too delicate. Ten years ago, we crammed this young tree, already far from bijou, into the back of the Ford Fiesta as both an inappropriate and irresistible bargain bin purchase. I have enjoyed our relationship, time for us both to move on. *more sobbing*

Onto Anemone nemorosa ‘Robinsoniana’ which is growing in our front garden and was a gift from the fine folk at Andrew’s Corner on the edge of Dartmoor. I have left the majority for the new incumbent, digging up a few rhizomes for both myself and my friend Pat the Field. They will enjoy South Wales, I am sure of it, and soon enough form an impressive springtime clump of joy. “Clump”, although a good word, is not to joyful word, perhaps cluster would be better?

Pat the Field, when she picked up her anemones, brought with her a bunch of her wonderful cut flowers; crazy parrot tulips, anemones, chunky rananculus, multi-headed narcissus, camassia. Hers is not just any field, it is a flower field. I am enjoying her blooms immensely; they are not only beautiful, but grown organically and with love. You just can’t beat that.

Tulipa ‘Burgundy’, I believe. A wonderful purple/red, blue centred lily flower, full of stardust. Oh, and another of those darned aphids!

Finally, there is a little misunderstanding that must be resolved.  There have been outrageous suggestions that Fat Ol is the Nom de Guerre of my OH. Nothing could be further from the truth. His name is not Ol.  In order to set the record straight, above is a rare shot of the infamous FO. He is a shy and retiring chap and, although at pains to put the record straight, is no lover of publicity. Reluctantly he agreed to the above shot. I hope that you now satisfied.

That is it, another six sixted. I can’t promise when next time will be, but there almost definitely will be one. Take care my friends.

Six on Saturday – Not Going Out

We made it to another Six on Saturday, hurrah!   If you are curious, pop on over to The Prop’s and find out what the rest of the gang are up to.  For some it will be spring, for some it will be autumn, but we are all united by one thing.   Things have slowed down, there is no need to rush as tomorrow will be soon enough, there is time to consider and immerse ourselves in the moment.  I find that very comforting in these strange times.  Let us meander to over to my chosen ones.

Firstly, we have a sublime double purple tulip.  I’ve looked for the label, but nothing.  I’ve looked for the packaging, but nothing.  Someone needs a firm talking to.  It is not the first time this has happened.  The worse thing is that it is a dreadful example to my esteemed clients, whom I mercilessly nag about keeping everything labelled.  It is a bit like telling everyone to stay home and then travelling to your holiday home 150 miles away.

Next we have the knicker elastic radishes, looking rather dandy.  I have been watering and cooing words of encouragement.  Their neighbours in the pot, some spring onions, have also begun to emerge.  Always a miracle.

Onto the red Woolies acer looking resplendent against the white-washed wall.  I think I might have used a similar photograph before, but I reckoned that nobody would remember or if they did, they wouldn’t care.

Now we have a jolly osteospermum.  The foliage is quite frankly rather ropey, as would befit any decent osteo at this time of year.  The flower is wonderful.  My head says “trim it back”, my heart says “not on your Nellie”.  Another battle to be waged.

Then one of my favourites in the garden, Anemone nemorosa ‘Robinsoniana’.  Every year I chop back the fuchsia in the front garden to allow this ethereal beauty to shine.  By the time the fuchsia has grown back, her moment in the spotlight is over and she is happy to play second fiddle.

Lastly the bronze fennel, Foeniculum vulgare ‘Purpureum’, that I dug up and disposed of a couple of years ago.  I may have left an iddy biddy bit behind.  Talking of behind.  Fat Ol’s sister Daisy thought my photo would be greatly enhanced by the addition of a sunbathing pussycat.  I agree.

That’s yer lot for another week, my friends.  Stay safe and well and home!

Six on Saturday – Pressure

Anemone nemorosa 'Robinsoniana'

As the weeks proceed this Six on Saturday malarkey is getting a little easier.  This is in part due to the season, but it is also because I have begun to pay more attention to my own garden.  Without wanting to get all slushy and sentimental about it, I must thank the King of Prop for making apparent my wicked and neglectful ways and setting me on the road to enlightenment.  Enough of that balderdash, if you want to know more, pop on over and see what the rest of the fan club have been up to. Shall we get this show on the road?  I think we should, it will be Sunday soon.

First of all we have an ethereal wood anemone,  Anemone nemorosa ‘Robinsoniana’.  This was a gift from the lovely Robin and Edwina Hill at the wonderful  Andrew’s Corner garden on the edge of Dartmoor, which coincidentally is open tomorrow under the National Garden Scheme.  Get there if you can!  Gift is a slight exaggeration.  In truth they had little chance of escape when I instigated my Lovely Plant Acquisition spell.  This is how it works: you stand over a plant and say in a very loud and pleading voice “I really, really, really, really, really love that plant”.  If you wish you can make a “woo woo” sound at the same time.  Of course, like many gardeners, they are generous folk and pretended to fall for my enchantment.  If you visit you might well see this one’s mama.

Next we have the emerging shoot of a rodgersia.  Hairy, unlike my legs.

tulips

These little species tulips, live in the Belfast sink in the front garden.  Which was a bit of a surprise.  I had forgotten that I had planted them and as the pixies seem to have stolen the label I have no idea what they are.  Yes, I know, again, after all I drone on and on about the importance of labelling, blah, blah, blah….. Well tough luck, its my party and I will cry if I want to.  Or indeed, not label my plants.  Note to any client that might be reading this.  This blatant flaunting of procedure is only allowed by me.  Full, accurate and comprehensive marking of all plants (in bestest handwriting and indelible pen) must be maintained at all times.  Hypocrisy, moi?

You may recognise this one.  It is the osteospermum that never sleeps. Through hell, high water, and a Devon winter.  Today I chopped off all its blooms, took cuttings, repotted it and wished it well.  Same for its dusky sister.  Harsh but fair.

Mukdenia rossiiNow we have the shiny little hands of Mukdenia rossii, a treasure in the saxifrage family.

Zaluzianskya ovataLastly we have Zaluzianskya ovata, also known as Star Balsam.  I know which name I will be using.  Beautiful in bud as well as in flower and, as its other common name Night Phlox suggests, night scented being pollinated by moths.  A little stunner.

Thanks King of Prop, see you next week, that is if I’m not too busy gardening trying to keep up to standard.  Now that cheeky Mr K has got fancy peonies in bloom, I’m going to have to up my game.  The pressure is on.  Adios!

Anemone nemorosa “Robinsoniana”

IMG_6218 - Copy

This delicate little beauty is flowering in my front garden at the moment.   Every time I walk past this very special wood anemone I think of Robin and Edwina and their wonderful garden at Andrews Corner on the edge of Dartmoor.   When I visited this treasure trove of a garden, far too long ago, it was given to me as a parting gift.  Coincidently they are open today for the National Garden Scheme http://www.ngs.org.uk/gardens/find-a-garden/Garden.aspx?id=6137.  I am sure the mother plant is also flowering her beautiful little head off, along with all kinds of other gems.  It is just a little too far for me to travel to find out, but if you can, then I certainly would.  If you need any more persuading, there are cream teas too!