Six on Saturday – Linkful

Another Six on Saturday and, with a little help from my friends, specifically my blogging mate Jude, I have discovered the link button in this “oh, so moderne” block editor. It seems fair to have used this newly discovered facility to direct you to Jude’s site where no doubt she has also, or is about to, produce a Six on Saturday. To catch up with the rest of the gang, pop over to The Venerable Prop’s site where you can feast on sixes from across the globe. Top tip: don’t try to eat them all at once, a few nibbles then return later for more goodies is how I avoid indigestion. I would recommend being especially cautious when approaching any contribution from a certain Mr K, he can be rather spicy.

One problem solved, another found. This seems to be my mantra. Now I am experiencing “the infuriatingly disappearing tags”, any ideas anyone? Don’t pass this off as fluff. It is an emergency. My frustration resulted in a bad word or six and a reversion to Classic Editor in order to sort it. Mind you, I have always been a classic gal. I have no remorse.

Shall we proceed? I think we should, it’s nearly Sunday.

First, we have another newbie to my gang, Fuchsia ‘Eruption’, seen here getting acquainted with the rhodohypoxis. I’m very fond of this form of fuchsia, which I like to call The Dangly Group, although I have suspicions there may be something more official.

Now Calendula ‘Neon’. This photo is possibly over-exposed, as it was taken during a full-on sunny abberation. But I liked the way it turned out, radiating solar energy with a patient bud waiting in the wings.

Aeonium ‘Zwartkop’ was a gift from Lady Mantle. Is it still called a gift when you ask for it? Not sure. I am pretty certain she was thinking of giving it to me anyway. We shall never know. For those of you with wicked minds, you know who I am talking about, I did not steal it.

Rose of no name. Fragrant, beautiful and a pain in the posterior.

On to Primula capitata ‘Noverna Deep Blue’, with a wonderful dusting of farina on indigo flowers. This is kept in a pot and circulated with the other seasonal favourites. When its glory time is over, it will be hidden around a corner with the other has-beens. Until next year, when it will hopefully shine again. If only life was like that. Glory then rest, repeat. I could live with that.

And finally, Aquilegia canadensis with its delicious St Clements bloom. I love it.

That’s me done, another week all sixed out. Stay safe my friends, its not over yet.

Six on Saturday – Resilience

It has been an eventful couple of weeks for the world; fire and flood, plague, false prophets, the whole shebang!  In my own small and insignificant world we have soldiered on, protected from all but a smidgeon of the evil portents, although not always with our smiley faces on.  There have casualties and but many more survivors.  This weekend is set to bring more challenges, which we have no option but to endure.  But there is nothing like nature to demonstrate resilience, the urge to survive is paramount.  To see how the rest of the Six on Saturday world is faring, check out what is going on over at The Prop’s where I am sure positivity will abound.  Let us get on.

First we have a hellebore which, with a little help from its lovely assistant, is showing its hidden beauty.  With its head hung low it has escaped the worst of winds.  Each year I promise to move it to a more accessible position.  Each year I forget/lose my bottle.

The bully boy in yellow pants, Narcissus ‘Tête-à-Tête’, was ravaged by our recent weather.  These flowering spikes were ripped from their planter several feet away and dumped unceremoniously on the ground.  I have no doubt they will return next year, despite their rough treatment.  I am very pleased to see the Aquilegia canadensis showing a leg in the background.

Next the glossy bronzed leaves of Pittosporum tenuifolium ‘Tom Thumb’ which is snuggled between a hydrangea and buddleia.  No sign of trauma here.  God bless hardy evergreens.

One of the branches of a large and very woody rosemary toppled during the reign of Ms Ciara.  I have decided to leave it be until the weather moderates.  A snail is very pleased that I have chosen a non-interventionist approach.

The Solanum rantonnetii is looking a little worse for wear.  Fried to a crisp and, bearing in mind the toxicity of the plant, not as tasty.  The plant is vigorous and I have every faith it will come back fighting in the spring.

Lastly an osteospermum providing breakfast, lunch and dinner for a small green caterpillar.  I wondered if it was an inch worm of some sort.  Perhaps.  It has had a good munch, which even the most hard hearted could not deny.

Stay safe, keep your chins up and dream of happy days.

 

Six on Saturday – Small but Pefectly Formed, Mainly

We are fair motoring through May.  I have an inkling we may be surpassing the speed limit.  It is hard to believe that already this is the last Six on Saturday for the month.  Whoever is in charge of time monitoring could they please slow it down a little?  There is an awful lot to do before summer begins.   Someone who is never to busy to herd us SoSers into some kind of order is The Propmiester, pop over to his site and you will find out what, where and how from across the known universe.

Shall we begin with a newcomer to the fold, Viola ‘Molly Sanderson’.  She arrived at Chez Nous with last week’s osteospermum and argyranthemum.  My plan was to trickle in these purchases so you wouldn’t judge me as someone with a minusule garden who keeps sowing seeds and taking cuttings and can’t be trusted to leave the house for a loaf of bread without coming home with a new plant.  This viola is an irresistible wonder.  A black hole of a flower, with a smidgeon of indigo ringed yellow at the epi-centre, drawing you ever inwards to your doom.  Perhaps not doom, more likely some delicious nectar and a truck load of pollen, if that is your tipple.

Unlike its hirsute cousins (and to be honest who doesn’t have one lurking somewhere in the family) this Iris sibirica is tall and elegant and understated.  The Salvia gesneriiflora photobombing the shot hasn’t stopped flowering since February and is getting bigger and flowerier (yes that is a word) by the day.  We won’t let its exuberance overshadow the restrained beauty of the iris.  Keep your eyes central everyone!

It is rhodohypoxis time again.  This might sound a little like an embarrassing medical condition but in reality refers to these alpine iced gems.  Somehow three varieties got mixed up and the garden demons stole their labels.  Therefore they are known as an assortment of loveliness.  It is my party.

On to Viola sororia ‘Freckles’ which found its way into my shopping bag last year.  It is the first time it has flowered for me and although very attractive I have a feeling it has yet to get into its stride.   Perhaps the dry weather is upsetting it (I am loathe to say drought just yet).

I grew this adorable Aquilegia canadensis from seed and the first flower is just beginning to unfurl.  Compared to the other self-seeding thugs that dominate our garden, albeit beautifully, at the moment, it is a breath of delicately fresh air.

Unlike Aquilegia ‘Egg’ which was also grown from seed.  This brassy number is bold and brash and shouts a whole lot louder than any other columbines in the vicinity.  I expect you can hear it from where you are.  It is called Egg because the seed was harvested at the farm where we get our eggs.  I suppose it was lucky it wasn’t called Chicken.

There we have it, another six done and dusted.  Next stop June!