Six on Saturday – Pale and Interesting

In my late teens, a few months after moving to Bristol, I returned to Cornwall for a first visit home. Whilst catching up with friends, someone commented that I was now “pale and interesting”. I interpretted this as he thought I looked ill. He was possibly right. This week’s Six on Saturday are pale and interesting, although none are, as far as I am aware, homesick.

First, we have Linaria ‘Fairy Bouquet’. As I am sure our Worshipful President The Prop, has a spreadsheet listing all entries in microscropic detail, double referenced, I would do well to confess that this little lovely has been featured before quite recently. This is a much paler seedling, and valiantly continuing to bloom, so doesn’t count.

Next we have a bonasi brugmansia. Brugmansia should not be bonsaied, it desperately needs to be repotted but the gardener has been lax. It is rather an embarrassment. The early morning dew captured on its hirsute foliage was an indication of the cold night. No frost yet though.

Now the ever delightful and diddy, Fuchsia microphylla. The common name is the small leaved fuchsia, although it is also small flowered. Pretty as a pixie picture. Try saying that after a pint of rough cider!

Next we have the skeletal remains of flower heads on the deep red hydrangea in the front garden. At the moment this shrub is holding new born, young, middle-aged and elderly flowers at the same time. I liked grandma the best.

Onto a rather tatty Salvia atrocyanea, doing its best in the circumstances. Blue flowers always make me a little giddy.

Lastly a magnificent tibouchina flower, but not the specimen featured last week in bud. I must confess to owning two plants, this one is Tibouchina ‘Groovy Baby’. Although not pale, it is very interesting and of course groovy, baby!

Stay safe and well my friends, I am especially thinking of those of you across the pond. Take care.

Six on Saturday – Sunny

Cosmos 'Purity'

The weeks are shepherding us towards winter, a time when finding suitable subjects for Six on Saturday becomes increasingly difficult.  The Lord of the Prop, whose mighty hand rules us SoSers, has followers from all corners of the earth and beyond.  For some of us spring is just getting into its stride, whilst for others the cold has already set in.  In this neck of the woods we are experience some deliciously clement weather, the sun is shining and although the mornings have a rousing chill, there is enough midday warmth to warrant a partial striptease.  Let us enjoy it whilst we can and get going on this week’s contribution.

After the hiatus in flowering, that I can only assume was caused by such heat and dry that nonplussed both plant and gardener, we are now making up for time.  There are many first time bloomers this week, including this Cosmos ‘Purity’ which although short in stature is forgiven for its perfect flowers.

Garlic 'Dario'

Top of the list for yesterday in the garden was getting my garlic planted.  This is a cultivar called Dario which is new to me, but I liked the name and felt like trying something new.  It is supposed to be strong-tasting and the word “excellent” was in the description.  Yes, I do believe everything I read.  We will have to wait until next summer to find out.   For the literatii amongst you, yes Mr K I’m taking about you, this photo is pre-planting.  It is posed.  If I posted a picture of a pot of planted garlic (tongue twister, give it a go) it would look like, well, a pot full of compost.   Rest assured that moments later the tubby cloves were pushed down to just cover their pointy heads.  Now we wait.

Salvia atrocyanea

Another later flowerer is Salvia atrocyanea, the Bolivian Sage.  Blue flowers have a special place in my heart and this is no exception.  Tall and vigorous once it gets going, this tuberous perennial is relatively hardy given a well-drained soil to snuggle up in.

osteospermum

The parent of this osteospermum didn’t make it through the various beasts of last winter/spring.  Luckily I had a back up which flowered earlier in the year and now is having another go.  Which has reminded me that I haven’t taken any cuttings.  Hopefully it isn’t too late, I am living rather dangerously.

Fuchsia 'Börnemann's Beste'

Now another plant that I have featured before, Fuchsia “Bornemann’s Beste”, which is also coming into its own at the moment.  It was glistening bewitchingly in the sun today, closer inspection (with specs on) revealed that it is covered with tiny silver hairs.  The gift that just keeps giving.

Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy'

Lastly we have a tatty old leaf of Cercis canadensis ‘Forest Pansy’.  It is featured for its pure resilience.  I was certain there would be not a leaf left in the whole Shire after Storm Callum bullied his way through last week.  A round of applause for FP please.  You can let go now.

That’s it my lovelies, another SoS completed.  Don’t forget to see what the rest of his disciples have been up to over at The Prop’s.  Until next time …….

 

 

 

 

Six on Saturday – Late on Parade

Hakonechloa macra 'Aureola'

Sorry, I’m a little late on parade.  I would love to say I had a pressing engagement, possibly top secret, which prevented me posting yesterday.  The truth is, however, other mundane stuff got in the way and the day slipped by on a banana skin.  Still I am here now and The Propagator, who manages the Six on Saturday Team, is very forgiving.  Hopefully.

My first contestant this week is Hakonechloa macra ‘Aureola’.  This variegated Japanese grass has a wonderful lax habit and its golden striped leaves are a joy.  As autumn proceeds red tinges are beginning to appear in its foliage.   It has just begun to flower, these are not showy plumes, but dainty has its place in my garden too!

Phyllostachys nigra

Phyllostachys nigra

The next contender is Phyllostachys nigra otherwise known as the black bamboo.  This was very fashionable (and we all know how much a follower of fashion I am) in the same decade as the ra ra skirt.  Luckily for the great British public, I only embraced one trend.  Unfortunately it is confined to a pot where it struggles on, giving me a dirty look each time I pass by.

Salvia atrocyanea

Salvia atrocyanea

Eventually the Salvia atrocyanea has come into flower.  And I mean flower, singular.  Just the one.  Next year Rodders, we will be millionaires.

Paraserianthes lophantha

Paraserianthes lophantha

And now for teacher’s pet, Paraserianthes lophantha, formally Albizia lophantha.   I have grown this fast growing tree from South Western Australia before.  Unfortunately it succumbed one especially chilly winter and I have mourned its passing ever since.  I sowed seed earlier this year and this one plant is the result.  Now all I have to do is get it through the winter!

Heliotropium arborescens 'Chatsworth'

Heliotropium arborescens ‘Chatsworth’

Next a fragrant one, a lavender coloured heliotrope, Heliotropium arborescens ‘Chatsworth’.  The bloom is looking a little weather-beaten, the leaves yellowing, but still the perfume is delicious.

Tibouchina 'Groovy Baby'

Tibouchina ‘Groovy Baby’

Lastly we have the small but perfectly formed Tibouchina ‘Groovy Baby’.  I bought this last year at Abbotsbury Subtropical Gardens in Dorset, wooed by both the manageable size and its funky name.  The shrub might be miniature but the flower certainly isn’t.

So that is it for another week.  Better late than never.  Thanks Mr P!  Will set my alarm clock for next week.

Six on Saturday – The Nearlys

Salvia corrugata

Saturday again and here is my contribution to The Honourable Mr P‘s Six on Saturday.   There is a thread running through this post, all my featured plants have something in common.  They are all Nearlys.  Not quite flowering.  Bearing in mind the recent weather, I can quite understand their reticence.  In the hope that by next week at least some of them may be in bloom, I will keep my words sparse.   It might help build the drama.

Our first plant is Salvia corrugata which is a little way off blooming, but with a sun-filled week it might be performing by next time.  So it is likely to be the week after.

Catananche caerulea 'Alba'

Catananche caerulea ‘Alba’

Next we have a white cupid’s dart, Catananche caerulea ‘Alba’.  It was grown from seed so we will see if it comes true.  Soon.

Tibouchina urvilleana

Tibouchina urvilleana

On to the delightfully diddy, dwarf Tibouchina urvilleana.  I will try and find out its cultivar name for next time.  Looking hopeful for an imminent flowering.

Salvia atrocyanea

Salvia atrocyanea

Now for a salvia, Salvia atrocyanea, which is not only looking like flowering for the first time this year but for the first time ever.  Maybe a couple of weeks, fingers crossed.

Bulbinella frutescens

Bulbinella frutescens

What next, oh yes, Bulbinella frutescens, grown from seed this year.  Just beginning to show off its starry yellow blooms.  Perhaps by next week it will look a little more impressive.

Hedychium greenii

Hedychium greenii

And finally Hedychium greenii, perhaps my favourite ginger lily.  That I have met so far.  You never know what is around the corner waiting to tempt you.  Also a little way off flowering, you may have to wait a few weeks to see this little beauty.

Which makes six (I did check).  Thanks Mr P.  Same time, same place?