Six on Saturday – Conform to Type

primula

For this Six on Saturday I have resolved to conform to type.   I will be featuring stereotypically seasonal issues only.  Possibly.  We shall see how that goes.  “What is this Six on Saturday?” I hear you ask.  “Have you just returned from trekking in the Amazon rainforest where you set up home with an indigenous tribe and lived isolated from western society for the past five years until you ran out of teabags and had to pop home to get some more?” I enquire.  No matter, I will explain.  It is quite simple: six, on Saturday.  For more details check out our very own tribal chief, The Propamaster, and he will get you up to speed on the fine print.

First we have a primula, primrose, first rose.  You might have noticed that it is blue, which is not totally traditional, but let us not get bogged down with the minutae.   I have a penchant for blue flowers so I was very happy to find this little lovely in the front garden.  I pointed it out to OH earlier and we agreed that neither of us had planted it there.  Or perhaps more accurately, “remembered” that we had planted it.

narcissus

Next the quintessential spring flower, all hail the daff!  No one can complain about any poetic licence with this choice, a classic yellow narcissus.  I was in Welsh Wales last weekend and was rather surprised to see they had seemingly shot up and budded in my absence.  Perhaps I was away longer than I imagined.

crocus

Now a crocus, bang on!  I imagine this little beauty was shifted out-of-place whilst I was rooting around removing summer bedding and planting out the violas.   A small joy, hugging the edge of the butler’s sink.

hellebore

Come on folks, I am surpassing myself here, now we have a hellebore!  This possibly has a name but I can’t be bothered to go out and look at the label.  Let us call it Purple Blotch.

slug

Not so welcome, but definitely a feature of the season, are the emerging slugs and snails.  This blatant destroyer was feasting on a pot of purple alstromeria that I am planning to pass on to Max.  Again, it definitely has a name.  Please see above for excuses.

Salvia corrugata

And here is the exception to prove my rule.  This Salvia corrugata has been flowering since time begun, and possibly a little before.  Unprotected, except by my love, it has weathered storms and a few degrees of frost.  Not classic winter/spring fare, but definitely worth a mention.

Now just a moment, we wouldn’t want a repeat of last week’s rather embarrassing faux pas …………… yep, we are definitely up to six, I checked twice.  That is it, another SoS completed.   Until the next time.  I will keep practicing my counting.

 

 

Six on Saturday – Time Flies

anemone

Six on Saturday time again.  The weeks are passing quickly and soon I will be back at work.  I am half looking forward and to half dreading this.  I will be very unfit, I am little nervous I will hurt my foot, and it is bloomin’ cold out there!  But on the plus side I will see all my lovely clients again, watch spring arrive in their gardens and have the joy of helping them plan for the future.  I spent  one lovely day in my own garden this week, and I picked a good ‘un.  It was sunny and warm and the ground was easy.   Not a great deal was achieved, except a lot of pottering and pondering.  Perfect.  Now on to what I found during my rumagings.

Our first picture is of the emerging foliage of Anemone coronaria ‘Bordeaux’.  As I am “on the wagon” at the moment, this is the closest I am going to get to a bottle of red.  I planted them in  the pot where the Hedychium ‘Pradhani’ lurks, they will be long over by the time that exotic creature wakes.

euphorbia

Next we have a blushing Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae, the wood spurge, looking like it is contemplating flowering.  This plant had a severe chop back last year after it was decimated by some strong winds.  Now it is a sturdy and strong specimen.  Rather like myself.  Admittedly I have never needed a chop back.  Next to it you can just about see the browning foliage of Salvia corrugata, which although a little tatty around the edges is still flowering.  Rather like …. you get the picture.

Miscanthus nepalensis

Now for Miscanthus nepalensis, whose golden tresses are now turning to silver.  It has done very well this year, for a young ‘un, and I am hopeful that next year it will be even better.

pyracantha

There is not a single fruit left on the pyracatha, stripped bare but for a couple of manky looking specimens.   As far as I am concerned this has negated its reason for existence, to me it just represents pain.  However, I am sure whoever has feasted on the succulent orange baubles will be looking forward to next year in anticipation.  It will therefore stay.

This was a hooray moment, pulling back the mat of dead monbretia foliage and finding these ruddy shoots below.  They belong to Paeonia mlokosewitschii, known to her friends as Molly the Witch.  She was a gift a few years ago and has yet to flower.  This year, it surely will be this year.  Someone has been having a bit of a nibble, hopefully I have now deterred them.

Lastly we have Pelargonium cordifolium var. rubrocinctum with friend and associated poo.   The caterpillar is so perfect in its Kawasaki greenness, and the matching heart-shaped leaves with tiny scarlet pin heads at the end of each tooth equally as wonderful.   We could do without the poo in the picture, but that is nature for you.  And yes, I let the caterpillar alone.  And yes, I realise that soon all will not be perfect.

Thanks for hosting this shindig to the caller of the dance The Propagator, long may he rule!

 

 

Six on Saturday – Accusations

rose

There have been accusations.   Wicked and cruel lies.  Rumours abound that I have been flaunting the Six on Saturday rules.  It would be unfair to name names as to the source of this gossip, but I will give you a couple of clues to their identity – Haribos and edifices.

I would like to put things straight.  Firstly, I must reiterate that I am far too scared of Our Leader (who has a chart and gold stars and black grim reaper stickers) to waiver from anything but the strict party line.  Secondly, there are rules?  Why didn’t anyone mention this before?

Onwards and upwards.  The first goodie of the day is an unnamed rose, already in the garden when we arrived.  A couple of days ago my OH made a special request for a photo of this beauty.   He says it reminds him of me – prickly and a bit rough around the edges.  It could have been much worse.  Unlike me it is deliciously fragrant and a repeat flowerer.  I really should take some cuttings.

Scabiosa 'Plum Pudding'

Next we have Scabiosa ‘Plum Pudding’, which has been bashed and buffeted about but is still hanging on it there.  The flowers out of season are lighter in colour and smaller in size than a few months ago, but still worthy.  Earlier in the week I sent The Prop some seed of this wonderfully richly coloured scabious.  Yes, that is right, a little bribery and corruption, anything to get another gold star, although to be honest he hasn’t mentioned one.  A little lax in habit, when placed with some supportive friends it will thank you (just like me).

Lavandula pinnata

Now the first Lavanula pinnata flower of the year, with a few more coming along in the background.  At first I thought it was a snail nestling in the bloom, but I’m wondering if it is the rear view of a ladybird.  I suppose I could go and check, but I’m not going to, looks cold out there, another storm on the way.   Whichever, it is probably quite happily in dreamland, overcome by the lethean effect of the lavender.

liquidambar

This is a new one to me, a tentacled fruit of Liquidambar styraciflua.  I have never seen one before, on our tree or any other, however I might just have been looking at my feet at the vital moment.  The RHS website describes them as “inconspicuous” – not so Your Highnesses, not so!  Once ripe I will of course be collecting the seed.  If I have plenty, I might share with anyone who likes growing things from seed ……..

Salvia corrugata

On to Salvia corrugata, just beginning to come into flower.  The mother plant died last winter, which is not really surprising as its home range is Peru, Coloumbia and Ecuador.  This is a cutting that was kept safe and sound.  Apparently seed was first collected from the wild in 1988 and all plants in cultivation come from the six seeds that germinated from that trip.  Precious.

Lastly we have a view of a section of the Bed of Anarchy.  Left to its own devices it has gone from strength to strength.  A few plants are struggling in the fray, but mostly they are finding their way and giving protection one another from wind, rain and chill.  Read whatever you will from that.

Another SoS completed, in time and on budget.   And the rules obeyed.  I must find out just what they are in time for next week.

 

 

 

Six on Saturday – Still Waiting

Honeysuckle

Once more unto the Six on Saturday, the global meme hosted by superhero The Propagator.  Following last week’s “Nearly’s” I am sorry to report that out of the six potential stars we only have one performer, and that is rather a half-hearted attempt.

So we will start with something that is at least trying, a honeysuckle, holding its flower head high above the griselinia hedge below.  No idea where it starts, or indeed where it ends, but I claim it as our own.

Pelargonium 'Pink Capricorn'

Pelargonium ‘Pink Capricorn’

Next we have Pelargonium ‘Pink Capricorn’ and friend.  I  featured this little beauty a couple of years ago in Pastel Power.  This means it has survived the onslaught of two wet and windy North Devon winters.  Fingers crossed for the next one!  And of course for the for the spider.

Salvia corrugata

Salvia corrugata

Here we have the sole member of last week’s bud group that could be bothered to flower in time for today. Salvia corrugata is making a feeble effort to bloom.  Don’t you realise that people are waiting!?

Acer palmatum

Acer palmatum

Having just tallied them up for the first time, I can report that we have five Japanese maples in pots.  They are various unnamed Acer palmatum cultivars, bought as tiny sticks many years ago. Several were from Woolworths, ah the wonder of woolies, we miss you.

osteospermum

Osteospermum

Another anonymous osteospermum, I love this copper colour, and like its golden counterpart included a couple of weeks ago, it has enjoyed a summer snuggled on a sunny step outside the kitchen door.

hedychium

Hedychium forgottenum

Lastly we have another ginger lily, unfortunately not the one I was hoping for.  Hedychium greenii has not moved one iota.  Still this first reserve hedychium has a stunning flower, a worthy understudy.  It was gift from Steve and Dawn at Devon Subtropical Garden.  To my great shame I have lost the label and don’t know which ginger it is.  I thought it was Devon Cream, but looking at it now I don’t think so. Rubbish gardener.  Steve and Dawn’s garden is open for the National Garden Scheme tomorrow, if you are in the area I highly recommend a visit.

That’s the lot, thanks Mr P!  I have a note from my mum for next week, so hopefully in a fortnight, like Arnie, I’ll be back.

Six on Saturday – The Nearlys

Salvia corrugata

Saturday again and here is my contribution to The Honourable Mr P‘s Six on Saturday.   There is a thread running through this post, all my featured plants have something in common.  They are all Nearlys.  Not quite flowering.  Bearing in mind the recent weather, I can quite understand their reticence.  In the hope that by next week at least some of them may be in bloom, I will keep my words sparse.   It might help build the drama.

Our first plant is Salvia corrugata which is a little way off blooming, but with a sun-filled week it might be performing by next time.  So it is likely to be the week after.

Catananche caerulea 'Alba'

Catananche caerulea ‘Alba’

Next we have a white cupid’s dart, Catananche caerulea ‘Alba’.  It was grown from seed so we will see if it comes true.  Soon.

Tibouchina urvilleana

Tibouchina urvilleana

On to the delightfully diddy, dwarf Tibouchina urvilleana.  I will try and find out its cultivar name for next time.  Looking hopeful for an imminent flowering.

Salvia atrocyanea

Salvia atrocyanea

Now for a salvia, Salvia atrocyanea, which is not only looking like flowering for the first time this year but for the first time ever.  Maybe a couple of weeks, fingers crossed.

Bulbinella frutescens

Bulbinella frutescens

What next, oh yes, Bulbinella frutescens, grown from seed this year.  Just beginning to show off its starry yellow blooms.  Perhaps by next week it will look a little more impressive.

Hedychium greenii

Hedychium greenii

And finally Hedychium greenii, perhaps my favourite ginger lily.  That I have met so far.  You never know what is around the corner waiting to tempt you.  Also a little way off flowering, you may have to wait a few weeks to see this little beauty.

Which makes six (I did check).  Thanks Mr P.  Same time, same place?