Six on Saturday – Time Flies

anemone

Six on Saturday time again.  The weeks are passing quickly and soon I will be back at work.  I am half looking forward and to half dreading this.  I will be very unfit, I am little nervous I will hurt my foot, and it is bloomin’ cold out there!  But on the plus side I will see all my lovely clients again, watch spring arrive in their gardens and have the joy of helping them plan for the future.  I spent  one lovely day in my own garden this week, and I picked a good ‘un.  It was sunny and warm and the ground was easy.   Not a great deal was achieved, except a lot of pottering and pondering.  Perfect.  Now on to what I found during my rumagings.

Our first picture is of the emerging foliage of Anemone coronaria ‘Bordeaux’.  As I am “on the wagon” at the moment, this is the closest I am going to get to a bottle of red.  I planted them in  the pot where the Hedychium ‘Pradhani’ lurks, they will be long over by the time that exotic creature wakes.

euphorbia

Next we have a blushing Euphorbia amygdaloides var. robbiae, the wood spurge, looking like it is contemplating flowering.  This plant had a severe chop back last year after it was decimated by some strong winds.  Now it is a sturdy and strong specimen.  Rather like myself.  Admittedly I have never needed a chop back.  Next to it you can just about see the browning foliage of Salvia corrugata, which although a little tatty around the edges is still flowering.  Rather like …. you get the picture.

Miscanthus nepalensis

Now for Miscanthus nepalensis, whose golden tresses are now turning to silver.  It has done very well this year, for a young ‘un, and I am hopeful that next year it will be even better.

pyracantha

There is not a single fruit left on the pyracatha, stripped bare but for a couple of manky looking specimens.   As far as I am concerned this has negated its reason for existence, to me it just represents pain.  However, I am sure whoever has feasted on the succulent orange baubles will be looking forward to next year in anticipation.  It will therefore stay.

This was a hooray moment, pulling back the mat of dead monbretia foliage and finding these ruddy shoots below.  They belong to Paeonia mlokosewitschii, known to her friends as Molly the Witch.  She was a gift a few years ago and has yet to flower.  This year, it surely will be this year.  Someone has been having a bit of a nibble, hopefully I have now deterred them.

Lastly we have Pelargonium cordifolium var. rubrocinctum with friend and associated poo.   The caterpillar is so perfect in its Kawasaki greenness, and the matching heart-shaped leaves with tiny scarlet pin heads at the end of each tooth equally as wonderful.   We could do without the poo in the picture, but that is nature for you.  And yes, I let the caterpillar alone.  And yes, I realise that soon all will not be perfect.

Thanks for hosting this shindig to the caller of the dance The Propagator, long may he rule!

 

 

Six on Saturday – Autumn Antics

It has been a rather discombobulating week, with midweek shenanigans and not much work.  The little work I did proved to be rather beneficial, it seems that I am no longer in denial about the onset of autumn.  It appears that I have caught up with everyone else, just in time for winter to rear its, potentially, ugly head.   This week I have enjoyed being wrapped up against the elements, the drizzle didn’t bother me, the urge to tidy was strong and truly enjoyable.  So much so, I worked in my own garden yesterday, before the “weather” arrived and I was reluctant to come in when it did.  Today I will be celebrating the autumn garden. Well my autumn garden anyway.  Six things in fact, which is just as well as this is Six on Saturday time again.  Swan on over to The Propagator’s site to discover what it is all about Alfie, where to send your blank cheques and read contributions from other mugs like myself SoSers.

First we have more from the Bed of Anarchy, which on reflection does sound like a death metal band.  The late flowering cerise cosmos are supporting themselves on the now monstrous Lycianthes rantonnetii.  This Paraguayan nightshade is also commonly known as the blue potato bush, neither of which are particularly decorative names, and has grown to its predicted 2m in one bizarre growing season.   Whether or not it will be allowed to stay is the subject of heated debate (with myself and therefore could run for weeks).  It may be located to someone with a more appropriately sized garden.

pyracantha

Next we have some pyracantha fruit, admittedly looking quite beautiful.  I may have mentioned it before (perhaps one hundred times) but I am not a fan of prickly plants.  And they know it.  This one, purchased by OH, is in a pot and has viciously stabbed me on numerous occasions.  Intentionally.   It knows it is quite safe.

Salvia 'Phyllis' Fancy'

Now for a newbie to the Heavenly Horti Family.  This is Salvia ‘Phyllis’ Fancy’ gifted to me by my old friend Hero.  I have long loved this salvia; hardy and long flowering and of course dreamily delicious with its violet calyx and tinged white flowers.   It was necessary to prop her up against the scaffolding for a spot of industrial chic and the fact that she is rather floppy.  At present she is banished to the naughty corner, as she brought a cargo of unwelcome whitefly with her.  All the same, a lovely present.

Honeysuckle berries

Onto more fruit, this time of the honeysuckle.  These strawberry jelly orbs are tasty morsels for hungry birds, fresh flowers are opening on a daily basis and it is quite thornless.  Am I making myself clear?

osteospermum

Now we have a slightly battered flower of the osteospermum that never sleeps.   A slight exaggeration perhaps (moi?).  The Beasts stopped it in its tracks, but after a rather harsh chop back earlier in the year and some encouraging words it has come back fighting.  Always a joy.

Salvia leucantha

Lastly we have Salvia leucantha, doing a fine impersonation of a purple wet dog.  It has been featured before, but realistically this is going to happen more often as the year progresses.  I am hoping that rather like myself, your memories are more patchy than photographic.

That’s it!  Another SoS completed!  Thanks Mr P for your leadership.  Same time, same place?

 

 

Six on Saturday – Disrupted

scaffold

It has been a disruptive week.  I am disrupted.  Bits all over the place.

Betwixt and between I have half an hour to spare.  What better use of this time than attempting a Six on Saturday.  I mean if Mr K can fell and dispose of a 15m length of leylandii and still contribute to The Propagator’s weekly assignment surely I can make the effort.  So this is it.  My disrupted effort.

Firstly we have scaffolding.  But you probably guessed that one.  They arrived yesterday morning.  One jolly, one with the demeanour of the devil.  That is just what I need in my life, I thought, another grumpy man.  They took out the front window and passed the uprights and crosses and planks and mud through out house.  Then it rained.  And galed.  And we dashed to cover and recover TV and books and chairs and grabbed paintings from the walls and watched our home implode.  Then they put the window back and we tided up.  All was well.  Until they come back to take it down again.

All my pots have been shoved, unceremoniously, into corners and alleys.  Many are out of reach, watering is not feasible, or my occasional tootling and worrying and nosing about.  One of which  has, by luck, found its way to the front of the corral is a garden centre rescuee, a “no label”.  This is when a little bit of knowledge comes in handy, and as you know a little bit is all I possess.  I was a little bit smug when this dark double auricula started to flower.  This is my glory shot.  Perhaps I should have saved it for later.

cosmos

Now we have the “cosmos that will not flower but is actually considering it now”.  Cheers mate.  About time.

Begonia

Next a begonia.  These are not my favourite.  I would not choose them, but OH thinks they are reliable and long flowering and trouble-free, all of which is true.  We must remember that it is not my garden, it is our garden.  This of course troubles me on occasion, but I have decided to keep OH for the meantime and therefore the begonias must also remain.

pyracantha

Another compromise, the pyracantha.  Prickly and painful.  But admittedly the fruit is both beautiful and worthy.

fuchsia

Lastly a garden stalwart, an anonymous fuchsia, which without care or attention returns each year with flowers aplenty.  No showstopper, but a fine spear carrier.

That is your lot.  Which is just as well because that half hour passed and things have been done and fine folk celebrated in the meantime.  Now I have returned and am ready to switch it all off. Thanks The Prop for your continuing propping.  Until next time ……

 

 

 

 

 

Six on Saturday – Angels and Demons

rose

Hip hip hooray, it’s another Saturday!  I’ve had a haircut and a bowl of chips with mayonnaise and now I am ready for anything.  Even a Six on Saturday.  No idea what I am talking about?  Where have you been?  Lost in the Bornean jungle, or Ikea’s soft furnishing department? Don’t worry, Sir Propalot will update you on proceedings.

First we have a splendid rose.  It was in the garden when we moved here, so I have a valid reason for not knowing which one it is.  I suppose I could do a little research, but to be honest I’m not that bothered.  All I know is that it is beautiful and fragrant.  Which is adequate.

Parahebe 'Snow Clouds'

Next we have Parahebe ‘Snow Cloud’ which has weathered the hard winter admirably. The other parahebe in the garden, although alive, has not fared so well.  It is looking decidedly ropey and is on the “pull yourself together or you are out” list.  Swotty Snow Cloud is definitely not on that list.  Straight to the top of the class you go!

pyracantha

Spikey plants are not encouraged in the gardens that I work in, let alone in my own.  OH bought this pyracantha, even though when he suggested it I said through gritted teeth “if you want it, feel free”.   I concede that it is great for the wildlife and the flowers are rather lovely.  This does not detract from the fact it is a vicious monster to the gardener.

primula

A little late to the spring party, but none the less very welcome, this primula is strutting its stuff this weekend.

Geranium nodosum

Earlier this week I said to Ms Button, whilst attacking the forest of mint that someone decided was a good idea to plant directly into the ground, “Do you ever wish you had a time machine and you could go back to the moment the offending plant was being planted and say “stop, in the name of humanity, do not put that thug in what is to become my garden!””  I would say just that to whoever planted this pink geranium in my garden.  It is a thug and pops up in, under and over everything.  I believe it to be Geranium nodosum.  Ruthless.

Rosa 'Rhapsody in Blue'

Last, but definitely not least, we have Rosa ‘Rhapsody in Blue’.   Not blue, but a rhapsody indeed.  Fragrant and floriferous.  Wonderful.

That is your lot, another week passes, another six to savour.  Some demons, some angels, some demonic angels, some …. you know where I’m going.  Thanks to The Prop, onwards and upwards!