Six on Saturday – Brrrrrr!

Galanthus 'S. Arnott'

Happy Six on Saturday to you all!  It has been a week of weather; from the unimaginable cold in the North of America to the searing heat in parts of Australia.  We had some of the white stuff in the UK too, which has been followed by the inevitable chaos on the roads and the panic buying of Mother’s Pride and Chardonnay.  In Ilfracombe we had a pathetic smattering, but you didn’t have to venture far to see the real McCoy.  But I didn’t bother venturing anywhere.  I decided to just imagine it instead.  This morning I asked OH if it was too late to indulge in a little panic buying.  We bought a multi-bag of snacktastic crisps and a pack of blood oranges just in case.   If you are tempted to join the not-so-secret society of SoSers or would like to be shown how it is supposed to work by more sensible folk, pop over to King Prop’s blog and all will be revealed.  Let’s get on with it, too cold to hang about.

First we have a snowdrop.  A distinct feeling of déjà vu?  This is in fact my other snowdrop Galanthus ‘S. Arnott’, also bought at Helen’s Little Ash Garden open day.  Don’t worry, this is the extent of my snowdrop collection.  I’ve got a long way to go before I can be classed as a true galanthophile.

Although we had but a mere smidgen of snow, it has been both very cold and exceptionally windy.  So windy that in the early hours of Sunday morning, after lying awake listening to the roaring and scaffolding boards dancing, we got up and listened to the World Service until light.  We then called the builder who came to tie down the boards again.  He was grumpy to have been roused from his weekend slumber, I hadn’t slept a wink all night, he didn’t stand a chance.  This Lycianthes rantonnetii is paying for its vigour, the leaves are withered and lifeless after the desiccating gales.  I am hoping that beneath all is well.

papaver

On to my oriental poppy.  It is in the middle of the superhighway that the builders macheted through the Bed of Anarchy.  By some quirk of fate it escaped a size ten steel toecap.  They were back yesterday, the Velux in the office roof has sprung a rather impressive leak.  Before they started I pointed it out to them  “That is a poppy” I said “It is called Simon and I would like you to do your utmost to avoid standing on it.”  They did their best.  Quite sensibly they were concerned about the potential for retribution by someone who names their herbaceous perennials.

hedychium It appears that one of my hedychiums has set seed.  This is good.  I have grown a ginger lily from seed before and it only took a few years to get to flowering size.  These will stay on the plant for as long as possible.  Perhaps Mr P would like some?  What do you mean “creep”?

Rose

Lastly we have an example of the importance of being in the right place at the right time.  The crimson tinged foliage of this rose, which could be ‘Peace’, has not suffered in the slightest in the recent inclement weather.   It is as fresh and pristine as the moment it unfurled from the bud.   I hope I haven’t summoned the demons of fate tempting.

gazania

And second lastly is a gazania that was in hiding, possibly due to the fact it doesn’t want to be spotted by the evil north wind.  Did I get away with it?  Maybe not.

Another SoS completed, always a triumph.  Until next time!

 

 

Six on Saturday – Still Waiting

Honeysuckle

Once more unto the Six on Saturday, the global meme hosted by superhero The Propagator.  Following last week’s “Nearly’s” I am sorry to report that out of the six potential stars we only have one performer, and that is rather a half-hearted attempt.

So we will start with something that is at least trying, a honeysuckle, holding its flower head high above the griselinia hedge below.  No idea where it starts, or indeed where it ends, but I claim it as our own.

Pelargonium 'Pink Capricorn'

Pelargonium ‘Pink Capricorn’

Next we have Pelargonium ‘Pink Capricorn’ and friend.  I  featured this little beauty a couple of years ago in Pastel Power.  This means it has survived the onslaught of two wet and windy North Devon winters.  Fingers crossed for the next one!  And of course for the for the spider.

Salvia corrugata

Salvia corrugata

Here we have the sole member of last week’s bud group that could be bothered to flower in time for today. Salvia corrugata is making a feeble effort to bloom.  Don’t you realise that people are waiting!?

Acer palmatum

Acer palmatum

Having just tallied them up for the first time, I can report that we have five Japanese maples in pots.  They are various unnamed Acer palmatum cultivars, bought as tiny sticks many years ago. Several were from Woolworths, ah the wonder of woolies, we miss you.

osteospermum

Osteospermum

Another anonymous osteospermum, I love this copper colour, and like its golden counterpart included a couple of weeks ago, it has enjoyed a summer snuggled on a sunny step outside the kitchen door.

hedychium

Hedychium forgottenum

Lastly we have another ginger lily, unfortunately not the one I was hoping for.  Hedychium greenii has not moved one iota.  Still this first reserve hedychium has a stunning flower, a worthy understudy.  It was gift from Steve and Dawn at Devon Subtropical Garden.  To my great shame I have lost the label and don’t know which ginger it is.  I thought it was Devon Cream, but looking at it now I don’t think so. Rubbish gardener.  Steve and Dawn’s garden is open for the National Garden Scheme tomorrow, if you are in the area I highly recommend a visit.

That’s the lot, thanks Mr P!  I have a note from my mum for next week, so hopefully in a fortnight, like Arnie, I’ll be back.

Six on Saturday – It’s a Miracle

Parahebe catarractae

It is Saturday.  Outside it is blowing a hoolie and periodically horizontal rain joins in the fun.  My ‘to do’ list makes War and Peace look like a novella.   I have writing to finish and don’t need any diversions thank you very much.  All great excuses not to participate in The Propagator‘s Six on Saturday.  But as I can be contrary even to myself, I thought, “why not, the rest can wait, I will brave the storm”.  And so I did.

First a stalwart of this little garden, Parahebe catarractae, which I believe might be now called Veronica catarractae, feel free to take your pick.  It was here when we arrived and flowers almost non-stop.  It was tempting to save this icy blue maiden for another day, for when I am desperate for blooms, but it deserved better than to be a fill-in.  Delicate, reliable, undemanding, all worthy attributes.

Liquidambar styraciflua

Liquidambar styraciflua

Next is our Liquidambar styraciflua, the American Sweetgum, which grows in pot in the small courtyard outside the kitchen door.  Totally inappropriate, but like a small child who wanted it now, I wanted it NOW.  Asking an assistant at a reputable plant centre (very very very reputable) if they sold liquidambars he said he had never heard of it and did I know the Latin name.  Um.  We found one in the end at “I can’t remember where” and it will have to stay in its temporary accommodation until we move to a mansion in the countryside with a couple of acres of land. Um again.

Argyranthemum

Argyranthemum

Right, who’s next?  Oh yes, this little argyranthemum, rescued in the spring from the bargain bin at a garden centre. It has battled, as everything out the front has, with prolonged and vicious mollusc attack.  Still, it has struggled through and hopefully will last the winter.  The Great Hedge of Ilfracombe next door has been cut down to a couple of feet, which has been wonderful for us and our sea views.  This might however be to the detriment of some of the more vulnerable over the winter months when the wicked winds pick up.  We will see.

Hedychium 'Tara'

Hedychium ‘Tara’

Now we have another of my beloved ginger lilies the exotic beauty, Hedychium ‘Tara’.  I think she speaks quite nicely for herself.

Pelargonium 'Calliope Hot Pink'

Pelargonium ‘Calliope Hot Pink’

On to a relatively new arrival to the fold, Pelargonium ‘Calliope Hot Pink’.  We are lucky hereabouts that pelargoniums often over-winter in our benign climate.  Cue the worst winter in living memory. Favourites do get protected from the worst of the rain and I think this may be one of the cossetted ones.  Just in case.

Fuchsia microphylla

Fuchsia microphylla

It wouldn’t be a Six on Saturday without a fuchsia.  So to conclude, the final contestant in today’s beauty contest is the diminutive and most charming Fuchsia microphylla.   When I was a child I loved visiting model villages, where everything was in miniature perfection.   This fuchsia evokes the same Lilliputian love in me.

There we have it Mr P.  Four weeks on the trot.  It’s a miracle.  It can’t possibly last.