Six on Saturday – Sunshine and Shouting

Japanese acer

First of all I must thank our glorious Six on Saturday leader, The Propagator of Lurve, for arranging this beautiful sunny day.  Take a look at his blog and all will be made clear about the SoS sect.  You may well come away more puzzled than before.  One or the other.   Anyway, this clement weather, subsection 3b “on a Saturday”, has been a long time coming.  I suppose our guru needed a little practice before he got it right.  There is no need for me to whine on about the depressing rain or snow or gales or drizzle or anything actually. People might begin to believe I am a happy, carefree kind of gal.  Here I was, proud recipient of the double whammy, inclination and opportunity, what could possibly go wrong?  But I had forgotten about external influences.  More specifically, a neighbour firing a nail gun intermittently all day, irregularly enough to make you jump a meter in the air at each shot.  In between times he was hammering, or shouting at his son, or they were both hammering or shouting, all on top of an enormous shed/store for artillery at the bottom of his garden.  Cheers mate.  Happy sunny day to you too.  Due to said suspect weapon stash I decided not to complain.  Not to him anyway.  Thanks for being a shoulder.

Let us get on with the job in hand, or it will be Sunday before we know it and I will be on the naughty step again and that Mr K will be pointing and giggling.  First of all we have a Japanese Maple, Acer palmatum, one of several we have in the garden.  All in pots.  Mainly brought from the greatly missed Woolworth’s for three shillings and thrupence.  The new foliage is a joy.

Secondly is a little alpine sink, which I replanted his last week with Sisyrinchium ‘E K Balls’, Scabiosa ‘Blue Jeans’ and Polygala chamaebuxus.  It had become overgrown and rebellious.  Now it is tamed and under my control.  I almost believed that when I typed it.  We all know different.

Virburnum x burkwoodiiNext is Viburnum x burkwoodii, an inherited shrub which battles on in the front garden, abused by weather and ignored by gardeners.  Until today.  Earlier in the week I visited some friends at The Round House in Ilfracombe.  One friend told me that, along with Daphne ‘Jaqueline Postil’, this hybrid was their favourite winter into spring scent.   Today, working in the front garden, the fragrance was incredible, both near and far.  How did I miss this?

On to the obligatory tulip, this time Tulipa ‘Blue Diamond’.  Not blue, no diamonds.  Pretty though.

Fritillaria meleagris 'Alba'

Now for a trio of white fritillaries, Fritillaria meleagris ‘Alba’.  This is a strange time of year, my gaze is intent on summer and I sometimes forget to appreciate the spring flowers that have struggled through such horrendous weather.  Although not as dramatic as its checkerboard brother, this albino sibling, with just a little blush on the shoulders, is a lovely light in the border.

And finally we have Fat Ol posing by a primrose.  Such a handsome lad and a great “help” to me in the garden.  Cat Help, that is.   This entails throwing himself in front of my feet causing me to do a cha cha cha in order to avoid standing on him, scratching posts in a virile manner, meowing at a pitch just above high C, insisting on attention when he wants it but ignoring me when I want it.  The usual.

Thanks to El Prop for another week of Six on Saturday and of course the good weather.  Same time, same place?

 

 

 

 

Six on Saturday – Still Waiting

Honeysuckle

Once more unto the Six on Saturday, the global meme hosted by superhero The Propagator.  Following last week’s “Nearly’s” I am sorry to report that out of the six potential stars we only have one performer, and that is rather a half-hearted attempt.

So we will start with something that is at least trying, a honeysuckle, holding its flower head high above the griselinia hedge below.  No idea where it starts, or indeed where it ends, but I claim it as our own.

Pelargonium 'Pink Capricorn'

Pelargonium ‘Pink Capricorn’

Next we have Pelargonium ‘Pink Capricorn’ and friend.  I  featured this little beauty a couple of years ago in Pastel Power.  This means it has survived the onslaught of two wet and windy North Devon winters.  Fingers crossed for the next one!  And of course for the for the spider.

Salvia corrugata

Salvia corrugata

Here we have the sole member of last week’s bud group that could be bothered to flower in time for today. Salvia corrugata is making a feeble effort to bloom.  Don’t you realise that people are waiting!?

Acer palmatum

Acer palmatum

Having just tallied them up for the first time, I can report that we have five Japanese maples in pots.  They are various unnamed Acer palmatum cultivars, bought as tiny sticks many years ago. Several were from Woolworths, ah the wonder of woolies, we miss you.

osteospermum

Osteospermum

Another anonymous osteospermum, I love this copper colour, and like its golden counterpart included a couple of weeks ago, it has enjoyed a summer snuggled on a sunny step outside the kitchen door.

hedychium

Hedychium forgottenum

Lastly we have another ginger lily, unfortunately not the one I was hoping for.  Hedychium greenii has not moved one iota.  Still this first reserve hedychium has a stunning flower, a worthy understudy.  It was gift from Steve and Dawn at Devon Subtropical Garden.  To my great shame I have lost the label and don’t know which ginger it is.  I thought it was Devon Cream, but looking at it now I don’t think so. Rubbish gardener.  Steve and Dawn’s garden is open for the National Garden Scheme tomorrow, if you are in the area I highly recommend a visit.

That’s the lot, thanks Mr P!  I have a note from my mum for next week, so hopefully in a fortnight, like Arnie, I’ll be back.

Unfurling

IMG_3336 (2)Over the years it has become apparent to me that some plants are more reluctant to awaken in the spring than others.  They like to take their own time, pootle along at their own rate, unaffected by what others may be doing around them, namely participating in the Great Spring Re-Clothing.  These plants are players in a horticultural soap opera, complete with a dramatic “will they wont they?”  cliff hanger, the following episode culminating in an emotional finale “yes I am still alive, and it was actually all a dream”.   In my garden the reticent “I’m just not a morning person” is Cercis canadensis  “Forest Pansy”. It may have good reason to be sloth-like as I have held it captive for the last few years in a pot.  A large pot admittedly but still a pot.  I wouldn’t blame it for being a little miffed.  However today I have spotted some buds so we should be on our way very soon.  The fine weather, a handful of fertiliser and a few encouraging words (delusional I know) and before long those demon hearts will be emerging again.  Whilst in confessional mode I should point out that we have several trees in pots; some delicate like the Japanese Maples, some less so like Liquidambar styraciflua.  It is a prime example of when Plant Lust wins over Plant Sense.  One day they will be released, but only on the day that I have the space to liberate them.  Until then I will try my best to keep them happy and recount tales of halicon days to come, when they will feel the bare earth beneath their roots and they will be able to run free ……….

This acer, however, is not ashamed to unfurl its merlot leaves for all to admire.