Six on Saturday – Accusations

rose

There have been accusations.   Wicked and cruel lies.  Rumours abound that I have been flaunting the Six on Saturday rules.  It would be unfair to name names as to the source of this gossip, but I will give you a couple of clues to their identity – Haribos and edifices.

I would like to put things straight.  Firstly, I must reiterate that I am far too scared of Our Leader (who has a chart and gold stars and black grim reaper stickers) to waiver from anything but the strict party line.  Secondly, there are rules?  Why didn’t anyone mention this before?

Onwards and upwards.  The first goodie of the day is an unnamed rose, already in the garden when we arrived.  A couple of days ago my OH made a special request for a photo of this beauty.   He says it reminds him of me – prickly and a bit rough around the edges.  It could have been much worse.  Unlike me it is deliciously fragrant and a repeat flowerer.  I really should take some cuttings.

Scabiosa 'Plum Pudding'

Next we have Scabiosa ‘Plum Pudding’, which has been bashed and buffeted about but is still hanging on it there.  The flowers out of season are lighter in colour and smaller in size than a few months ago, but still worthy.  Earlier in the week I sent The Prop some seed of this wonderfully richly coloured scabious.  Yes, that is right, a little bribery and corruption, anything to get another gold star, although to be honest he hasn’t mentioned one.  A little lax in habit, when placed with some supportive friends it will thank you (just like me).

Lavandula pinnata

Now the first Lavanula pinnata flower of the year, with a few more coming along in the background.  At first I thought it was a snail nestling in the bloom, but I’m wondering if it is the rear view of a ladybird.  I suppose I could go and check, but I’m not going to, looks cold out there, another storm on the way.   Whichever, it is probably quite happily in dreamland, overcome by the lethean effect of the lavender.

liquidambar

This is a new one to me, a tentacled fruit of Liquidambar styraciflua.  I have never seen one before, on our tree or any other, however I might just have been looking at my feet at the vital moment.  The RHS website describes them as “inconspicuous” – not so Your Highnesses, not so!  Once ripe I will of course be collecting the seed.  If I have plenty, I might share with anyone who likes growing things from seed ……..

Salvia corrugata

On to Salvia corrugata, just beginning to come into flower.  The mother plant died last winter, which is not really surprising as its home range is Peru, Coloumbia and Ecuador.  This is a cutting that was kept safe and sound.  Apparently seed was first collected from the wild in 1988 and all plants in cultivation come from the six seeds that germinated from that trip.  Precious.

Lastly we have a view of a section of the Bed of Anarchy.  Left to its own devices it has gone from strength to strength.  A few plants are struggling in the fray, but mostly they are finding their way and giving protection one another from wind, rain and chill.  Read whatever you will from that.

Another SoS completed, in time and on budget.   And the rules obeyed.  I must find out just what they are in time for next week.

 

 

 

Six on Saturday – I made it in the end

Dahlia coccinea

I definitely wasn’t going to do a SoS this week, categorically not.  Then I relented, I changed my mind.  Which is par for the course.  Please bear this in mind if you are trying to persuade me to co-star with Hugh Jackman in a remake of Les Mis.

Here we are again, and which means so is the King of Prop-ing (if you say it right it does scan, you may have to practice or take my word for it), pop over to discover what is happening in the Kingdom of Prop.

Let us begin with Dahlia coccinea, grown from seed several years ago, and only now coming into flower.  All my dahlias stayed out last winter, with little if any protection.  This is not a boast.  My head is hung in shame.  And for this neglect I have been rewarded with sad plants that are blooming late.  Next year ….

Hibiscus syriacus

Secondly is an unnamed (names cost more) hibiscus, rescued from the bargain bin of a supermarket.  Most probably a cultivar of Hibiscus syriacus, it deserved better treatment.  I am yet undecided whether it will remain Chez Nous, or be adopted by one of my lovely clients.

agapanthus

Now an agapanthus, the old faithful who never fails to perform.  But all is not sweetness and light. Over winter it acts as a cosy hostel for the all especially delinquent snails in the neighbourhood.  As I am on to this ploy, they are gathered up and relocated, mainly to snail heaven.  If I am feeling particularly magnanimous they are put in the green bin where they go to ….. well who knows?!

Scabiosa 'Plum Pudding'

Next we have Scabiosa ‘Plum Pudding’, itself a rather unruly customer, lolling all over the place with little if any decorum.  Luckily the flowers are so ripstockingly wonderful, it is forgiven this lacking in the grace department.

sempervivum

How are we getting on?  Are we there yet?  Not quite.  Here is a little sempervivum.  It thrives on sun and neglect.  Double whammy.

Salvia 'Nachvlinder'

And finally we have Salvia ‘Nachtvlinder’ and friend.  I snapped away at this for a while, flowers dancing in the wind, bee holding on for dear life.  All the fun of the fair.

Another SoS under my belt.  And to think I wasn’t going to bother.  Thanks Your Propping Highness, until next time.

 

 

 

 

Strange Fruit

tomato

This strange fruit caught my eye today at The Farm.

On closer inspection all became clear.

In the past year I have created a new tradition.  When harvesting tomatoes I throw any that have split or been munched by one of the non-human inhabitants of the greenhouse, out of the door and over the scrubby hedge towards the new orchard.  Here, I imagine, the local wildlife will gorge on this sweet feast.  Perhaps the ponies, wandering in their summer pasture will enjoy a few. Maybe a forest of new plants will appear next spring.

What I didn’t consider, in my greenhouse musings, was that one of my lobs would land square on the spine of a hawthorn tree forming part of the hedge.  I wonder what any passing birds will think of this bizarre creation?  Hopefully that it is very tasty!

When I wasn’t playing Spear the Tomato I was collecting seed.   Most especially from a wonderful scabious of which I have gathered a fair amount.  I featured this marvellous plant earlier in the year, here is a reminder Scabiosa ‘Plum Pudding’ .   Anyone (within reason) who would like some seed, please let me know.