Six on Saturday – Bad Cop

Shall we cut to the chase. We have known each other long enough to be totally honest with one another. You know what comes next. I give The Prop a bit of a big up and a semi-amusing title, he totally ignores me, I waffle on a bit about stuff that no one quite understands and then I share some photos with you. Same old, same old. Well from now on there is going to be a new me: tough, unforgiving, ruthless. No more creeping around TP, no more nice little Gillykins, I have a new persona – Bad Cop. I’ll give a go anyway. Come on, you motley crew, let’s get this over and done with.

First we have a hitchhiking nasturtium, I love the scary teeth and its insistent ways. It doesn’t let anything stand in its way, it just forces through, taking no prisoners in its quest for garden, nay world, domination. Most admirable. (And the bumblebees love clambering through to the rewards behind.)

Next is Impatiens omeiana, slow to flower even though I have tended it. Some plants you just can’t please. You give and give and they can’t even be bothered to try. (Although to be honest the beautiful foliage is quite enough.)

Then Salvia ‘Neon’ which is looking rather pathetic in the rain. Don’t fall for that romantic raindrop nonsense. (The colour is stunning and not captured by my photo, I always have trouble with strong pinks.)

Now an unknown plant which was in a basket of flowers that my brother bought mum for Mothers Day. As soon as I moved in I chucked it out. Peggy needed to be reminded who was No. 1 child. (In reality it didnt go far and this little beauty is doing quite nicely. I will pot it on.)

Onto Correa schlechtendalii, what a name, seriously does anyone expect me to remember that! (But of course I shouldn’t moan about a word that isn’t familiar to me because it hails from a foreign language. Oh yes, and the flower is very pretty.)

Finally, another flouncy show-off attempting the dewy eyed look, AKA, the second Hibiscus syriacus in my temporary garden. (It is a large shrub and in the far corner, so I picked a few stems and put them in a vase for Peggy to admire.)

Over and out. (How did I do?) (Have a good week) (Take care and stay safe)

Six on Saturday – AWOL

I am not actually here. In fact at this very moment I am probably jet washing Lord and Lady Mantle’s silverware or polishing the throughbreds. Yes, we have left Welsh Wales for the weekend and are visiting the grand abode of the aforementioned dignitaries. In normal circumstances, this would make it tricky to post my offering, but I have been able to complete my Six on Saturday mission with the help of a secret accomplice. Many thanks to him. I may well pay later. Find out what is happening on planet SoS by visiting The Grand Vizier of Propolopolis where his royalness and his faithful acolytes can be found Sixing all over the world. Shall we proceed, the chinchillas won’t walk themselves.

First we have an unnamed hibiscus in Peggy’s garden. I suspect it is H. syriacus and I also suspect that I planted it, along with another which is just about to bloom. Something of the exotic is always welcome.

Next a lacecap hydrangea which is being bullied out by its neighbours but has managed to sneak a couple of flowers through the foliage of the offending shrubs. It is very pretty, I might take a cutting. Hydrangea-love is something that sneaks up on you unawares. Not that I’m complaining, the more love the better.

Now we have a cutting of Abelia floribunda which at 10cm tall is getting a little ahead of itself. Not yet, my lovely, concentrate of growing strong before you start showing off! I nipped off the bloom just after the photo was taken. Sometimes you have to be cruel to be kind.

One of the very few plants (leave me to my delusions) that I have purchased since moving here is this white agapanthus. It sang the Song of the Sirens to me when we were visiting an open garden in the village. Do not fear, this is not a confession of another felony, it was in the plant sales.

A couple of weeks ago I got a top tip that some hanging baskets were going cheap and these hanging baskets were stuffed full of apricot tuberous begonias. The rest is history.

Finally, when ordering some radish seed a couple of weeks ago, somehow a packet of Aloe polyphylla fell into my virtual basket. I have been mesmerised by this Fibonacci succulent for a while now, but I have never been able to justify the cost of a plant. The little five seeds have been soaking in water for a few weeks and, thrillingly, one of them has germinated. This week I potted it up into a small terracotta pot and am hoping for the best. I have a feeling it might end in tears. It is tiny and vulnerable, the horicultural grit looks like landscape of boulders. Still, faint heart never grew fair aloe.

That is your lot for today. Hope all is well with the gang. ‘Til next time.

Six on Saturday – I made it in the end

Dahlia coccinea

I definitely wasn’t going to do a SoS this week, categorically not.  Then I relented, I changed my mind.  Which is par for the course.  Please bear this in mind if you are trying to persuade me to co-star with Hugh Jackman in a remake of Les Mis.

Here we are again, and which means so is the King of Prop-ing (if you say it right it does scan, you may have to practice or take my word for it), pop over to discover what is happening in the Kingdom of Prop.

Let us begin with Dahlia coccinea, grown from seed several years ago, and only now coming into flower.  All my dahlias stayed out last winter, with little if any protection.  This is not a boast.  My head is hung in shame.  And for this neglect I have been rewarded with sad plants that are blooming late.  Next year ….

Hibiscus syriacus

Secondly is an unnamed (names cost more) hibiscus, rescued from the bargain bin of a supermarket.  Most probably a cultivar of Hibiscus syriacus, it deserved better treatment.  I am yet undecided whether it will remain Chez Nous, or be adopted by one of my lovely clients.

agapanthus

Now an agapanthus, the old faithful who never fails to perform.  But all is not sweetness and light. Over winter it acts as a cosy hostel for the all especially delinquent snails in the neighbourhood.  As I am on to this ploy, they are gathered up and relocated, mainly to snail heaven.  If I am feeling particularly magnanimous they are put in the green bin where they go to ….. well who knows?!

Scabiosa 'Plum Pudding'

Next we have Scabiosa ‘Plum Pudding’, itself a rather unruly customer, lolling all over the place with little if any decorum.  Luckily the flowers are so ripstockingly wonderful, it is forgiven this lacking in the grace department.

sempervivum

How are we getting on?  Are we there yet?  Not quite.  Here is a little sempervivum.  It thrives on sun and neglect.  Double whammy.

Salvia 'Nachvlinder'

And finally we have Salvia ‘Nachtvlinder’ and friend.  I snapped away at this for a while, flowers dancing in the wind, bee holding on for dear life.  All the fun of the fair.

Another SoS under my belt.  And to think I wasn’t going to bother.  Thanks Your Propping Highness, until next time.

 

 

 

 

If you can’t take the heat

9 Hibiscus

The heater in my car is jammed on.  I have had it fixed but it has broken again.  This makes any journey over 5 miles long challenging, especially throughout the summer months. The experience of driving from South Wales to North Devon today was interesting.  It was like being in a Native American sweat lodge without the benefit of a spiritual experience.  All we had were butter mints and a luke warm bottle of water and I’m not sure they count as sacred fare.  Three of my passengers however were quite thrilled at this tropical trip: Mexican firecracker Dahlia “Mystic Spirit”, Asian beauty Hibiscus syriacus and the Mediterranean siren Teucrium fruticans.   At least somebody was happy!