Six on Saturday – Compass Point

It is Six on Saturday time again, which is serving as a welcome compass point. Although hard to believe, the days this week have seemed more confused than ever. Cancellations, rearrangements and future plans, when the future was previously barely credible, have all served to muddy my already murky waters. For that reason it is nice to know that this is Saturday and only Saturday, for that is all it could be. If you wish to discover further benefits to SoS participation, then pop over to The Propagator to find out more, or perhaps even less, my compadres are also often muddled. Let us get on or I will be getting in trouble with the Strict Task Master across the Channel, no Fred, not you, the other Channel.

First, a leaf of Brugmansia ‘Grand Marnier’ and friend. You must forgive for the blurry photograph, it was early morning, before my 100% proof flagon of coffee. During my garden meanderings I spotted this critter and ran (wobbled) back to the house to get my camera. All that exertion was too much for me, hence shake. And no, it was nothing to do with gin. This brugmansia has not thrived, possibly due to being in too small a pot. Last weekend this was rectified, so now has absolutely no excuse not to do something fabulous.

Next, a dear little erodium, nestled in an alpine planter bought lock, stock and barrel from a bargain bin, far, far away. It has subsequently been ignored. Everyone loves a trouper.

Now the absolutely gorgeous Diascia personata, a gift from my friend Chloris. She is not only generous, she also has impeccable taste. Its common name is masked twinspur. After absolutely no research on this matter at all, I can only surmise this is due to its twin spurs which are masked. I wouldn’t quote me on it.

On to a teasel water reservoir. This is son of, son of, son of etc the teasel that hitched a ride from our previous home in Bristol. We love teasels in our house. Although none of the current generations have reached the dizzying heights of their predecessor, all are loved. Next door has a new bird feeder which has attracted a family of goldfinches, hopefully they will still be about to enjoy our offering. Yesterday I was watching a fledgling on the telephone wire outside our bedroom window, gloriously twittering for some grub. A joy.

Now for Impatiens puberala, just coming into flower. A great favourite of mine, although I am sure it would be happier in the ground or living with someone with a better watering ethic.

Lastly Dichelostemma ida-maia, which I featured as a mere shoot in an earlier SoS. It has suffered badly from the onslaught of molluscs. The attack has been relentless. Although the flower is not fully out, I didn’t want to miss this opportunity to share. It might be in the belly of a snail tomorrow.

That’s it, all done for another week. Take care my friends.

Sigh

Clematis tangutica

This isn’t a moan, or a gripe, or a temper tantrum.  Maybe it is a little bit of each.  Mainly it is a sigh.

I had a wonderful afternoon in the garden.  My garden.  Potting on cuttings, pricking out seedlings, pootling about.  Marvelling at the anarchy of the borders and making strange noises at next door’s cats.  All was well in the world.

Clearing up I wandered out to fill the green bin and had a gander around whilst I was there.  Which was where Disney turned to Tarantino.  The half barrel, previously full of life, was now barely half alive.  Where there had been an enthusiastic Impatiens puberula there was now mush.  The vigorous dark-leaved geranium now reduced to a single anaemic leaf.  An almost geometric line across the container was now dead or dying.  What catastrophic event had occurred?

I texted the builder “please pop around before you go home”.  He arrived with his mate, all dewy eyed and hopeful.  We stood around the container and gazed at the carnage, each hopeful that Scotty would beam us up.  He did not deny it was their fault.  Mr Nobody had obviously tipped something on the unassuming plants.   He was very sorry.  He did look quite sad.

I tried to be cross.  I am rubbish.  Sigh.

As you are unlikely to enjoy the sight of dead plants, you can wonder at the beauty of flowers and seed heads of  Clematis tangutica .

Sigh.

Six on Saturday – Ruthless

Bidens 'Firelight'

Beware, I am in a ruthless mood today.  Inhabitants of the garden that have not been performing to my exacting standards have been extradited to the green bin.  Oleander that has never flowered, promised once but was only joking – Out!  Dead stick thing that has been in extensive care for so long the label has rubbed clean – Out!  Scrubby grass with no aesthetic merit whatsoever but for some perverse reason I have always felt sorry for – Out!  OH has been hiding.

I feel cleansed and ready to write my Six on Saturday.  We are semi-anarchic group led by Prop Guevara, take a look at his manifesto and all will become clear.  You will also meet others in this band of merry folk.

My first offering is Bidens ‘Firelight’.  I am fond of bidens.  They seem to like me too.

Next we have Impatiens puberula,  which earlier this year I transferred from its pot in the back garden into a large barrel in the front garden.  After an initial period of homesickness, it has settled in very well, spreading dramatically and beginning to flower well.  It is not surprising that it is a little ragged around the edges.  The very un-British weather we are enjoying hasn’t really suited this native of cool moist forests in Nepal.

You can have too much of a good thing.  This Verbascum chaixii, the nettle leaved mullein, has done too well.  After it has flowered, in the autumn I suppose, it will be lifted and divided and shared to all and sundry.  In the meantime it is providing a feeding station for bees, no caterpillars spotted yet.

Catanache caerula 'Alba'

Catanache caerulea ‘Alba’, or the white cupid’s dart, is next.   I grew this from seed last year.   The joy of seeing a flower bloom that you have propagated never diminishes.

watsonia

Now a watsonia seedling, a bit of a tender Terry, it was one of the many I was worried about earlier in the year.  It is not flowering as prolifically as it did last year, but I can forgive it for the harsh treatment it withstood.  The colour is wonderful.

grasshopper

Sat on the steps earlier, worn out by my tyranny, I felt that I was being watched.  Glancing sideways at the pot of begonias to my right, I saw this little chap, who kindly stayed in position whilst I dashed inside to get my camera.  As for the rest of the plants, you can all relax now.  For the moment anyway.

That is that.  All done.  Thanks for your leadership Propman.  Next week perhaps …..

 

Impatient

Impatiens puberula

I was thrilled to find a flower on my Impatiens puberula today.  It is the first time this plant has bloomed and I am very excited.  There is absolutely no way I could possibly wait until next Saturday to share this little beauty with you.  Here it is, so gorgeous!

Now who is the impatient one?